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5 Types of Narcissism and How to Recognize Each

As a personality trait, narcissism can come in many forms and levels of severity. As a mental health condition, there’s only one diagnosis.

You might be wondering, “What does it actually mean to be narcissistic?” Are we using this label too broadly, or are there different types of narcissism?

In fact, you may have noticed terms like “narcissist” and “narcissism” are becoming increasingly popular. There are even a few lists of “famous narcissists” going around.

It seems everyone knows someone — whether it’s a family member, coworker, or frenemy — who fits this label. But these terms are also loaded and highly stigmatized.

This is why it’s important to understand what they really mean and how they manifest.

How many types of narcissism are there?

As a mental health diagnosis, there’s only one. But it can manifest in different ways, as does the personality trait.

On a general level, narcissism is closely tied to:

  • extreme self-focus
  • an inflated sense of self
  • a strong desire for recognition and praise

But if you talk about types of narcissism, researchers have broken down the narcissistic personality trait into:

  • overt narcissism
  • covert narcissism
  • antagonistic narcissism
  • communal narcissism
  • malignant narcissism

It’s also possible to look at narcissism in terms of how it affects your day-to-day life and ability to form relationships.

In this context, narcissism can be either adaptive (helpful) or maladaptive (unhelpful).

The point of using categories is not necessarily to label someone you think might have narcissistic qualities.

In fact, some suggests it could be more accurate to view narcissism as on a spectrum from less to more severe. You might then imagine that the different “types” of narcissism fit somewhere along that spectrum.

Instead, taking a closer look at the different types of narcissistic personality traits can help us understand more about the thought processes, emotions, and behavioral patterns that tend to show up with narcissism.

Adaptive versus maladaptive narcissism

Some research draws a line between adaptive and maladaptive narcissism. This helps to show the difference between productive and unproductive aspects of narcissism.

  • Adaptive narcissism refers to aspects of narcissism that can actually be helpful, like high self-confidence, self-reliance, and the ability to celebrate yourself.
  • Maladaptive narcissism is connected to traits that don’t serve you and can negatively impact how you relate to yourself and others. Entitlement, aggression, and the tendency to take advantage of others fit under the umbrella of maladaptive narcissism. This would be associated with symptoms of narcissistic personality disorder.

When most people talk about narcissism, it’s the maladaptive kind they’re referring to.

Unlike adaptive narcissism, maladaptive narcissism is connected to:

  • self-consciousness
  • low self-esteem
  • higher chances of experiencing unpleasant emotions
  • lower empathy

Research has found that while maladaptive narcissism tends to decrease the older we get, adaptive narcissism doesn’t decline as much over time.

In addition, both adaptive and maladaptive narcissism can be passed on through genes and influenced by your childhood upbringing.

Overt narcissism

Overt narcissism is also known by several other names, including grandiose narcissism and agentic narcissism.

This type of narcissism is what most people associate with a narcissistic personality.

Someone with overt narcissism might come across as:

  • outgoing
  • arrogant
  • entitled
  • overbearing
  • having an exaggerated self-image
  • needing to be praised and admired
  • exploitative
  • lacking empathy

Some research connects overt narcissism with the Big Five personality traits extraversion and openness.

It also suggests people with overt narcissism are more likely to feel good about themselves and less likely to experience uncomfortable emotions like sadness, worry, or loneliness.

People with overt narcissism may also tend to overestimate their own abilities and intelligence.

One study published in also suggests overt narcissism might cause someone to overestimate their own emotional intelligence.

Covert narcissism

Also known as vulnerable narcissism and closet narcissism, covert narcissism is the contrast to overt narcissism.

While many people think of narcissism as a loud and overbearing trait, people with covert narcissism don’t fit this pattern.

Instead, some common traits of someone with covert narcissism include:

  • expressions of low self-esteem
  • higher likelihood of experiencing anxiety, depression, and shame
  • introversion
  • insecurity or low confidence
  • defensiveness
  • avoidance
  • tendency to feel or play the victim

While someone with covert narcissism will still be very self-focused, this is likely to conflict with a deep fear or sense of not being enough.

A on personality and covert narcissism published in found that it was most strongly linked to high neuroticism (tendency to experience unpleasant emotions) and disagreeableness.

Someone with covert narcissism is likely to have a hard time accepting criticism. But unlike a person with overt narcissism, someone with covert narcissism may be more likely to internalize or take in the criticism more harshly than it was intended.

Research suggests the categories of covert and overt narcissism aren’t always mutually exclusive. In other words, someone with overt narcissism might go through a period where they show more signs of covert narcissism, for example.

Antagonistic narcissism

According to some research, antagonistic narcissism is a subtype of overt narcissism. With this aspect of narcissism, the focus is on rivalry and competition.

Some features of antagonistic narcissism include:

  • arrogance
  • tendency to take advantage of others
  • tendency to compete with others
  • disagreeability or proneness to arguing

According to research from about facets of narcissism and forgiveness, those with antagonistic narcissism reported they were less likely to forgive others than people with other types of narcissism.

People with antagonistic narcissism may also have lower levels of trust in others, according to a study.

Communal narcissism

Communal narcissism is another type of overt narcissism, and it’s usually seen as the opposite of antagonistic narcissism.

Someone with communal narcissism values fairness and is likely to see themselves as altruistic, but research published in suggests there’s a gap between these beliefs and the person’s behavior.

People with communal narcissism might:

  • become easily morally outraged
  • describe themselves as empathetic and generous
  • react strongly to things they see as unfair

So what makes communal narcissism different from genuine concern for the well-being of others? The key difference is that for people with communal narcissism, social power and self-importance are playing major roles.

For example, while communal narcissism might cause you to say (and believe) you have a strong moral code or care for others, you might not realize the way you treat others doesn’t match up with your beliefs.

Malignant narcissism

Narcissism can exist at different levels of severity, and malignant narcissism is a form. It can also cause more problems for the person living with it.

Malignant narcissism is more closely connected to overt than covert narcissism.

Someone with malignant narcissism may have many common traits of narcissism, like a strong need for praise and to be elevated above others. But in addition, malignant narcissism can show up as:

  • vindictiveness
  • sadism, or getting enjoyment from the pain of others
  • aggression when interacting with other people
  • paranoia, or heightened worry about potential threats

Someone with malignant narcissism may also share some traits with antisocial personality disorder. This means someone with malignant narcissism could be more likely to experience legal trouble or substance misuse.

In a small study involving people with borderline personality disorder (BPD), those with malignant narcissism had a harder time reducing anxiety and gaining better ability to function in day-to-day life.

Let’s recap

Narcissism — whether it’s a personality trait or personality disorder — can make relationships more challenging. Different types of narcissism, whether overt, covert, communal, antagonistic, or malignant, can also affect how you see yourself and interact with others.

When it comes to treatment, narcissism can be tricky because many people living with it don’t necessarily feel the need to change. But living with narcissism does pose its own mental health effects, including anxiety, depression, and substance use — and sometimes the impact of these effects cause the person to reach out for help.

When someone living with narcissism seeks professional support, there’s a lot of potential for growth and improved mental health.

If mental health care for narcissism sounds like something that could be helpful for you, you can learn more about your options here.

Sours: https://psychcentral.com/health/types-of-narcissism

Surviving A Narcissist

It’s possible to cope with narcissists. There’s a way to reclaim your happiness. Two of WilmU’s College of Social and Behavioral Sciences’ certified counselors and faculty explain how.

Dr. Walsh and Dr. Grande

L-R, Dr. James Walsh and Dr. Todd Grande

The good news is that the world is full of thoughtful people who value others, give attention rather than seek it, and own their weaknesses. We see our value in their eyes and learn to recognize it in ourselves.

Yet even the most inspiring people are a little narcissistic. In fact, we all are, and that’s a good thing.

Healthy narcissism equals healthy self-esteem, which helps us recover from failure and work toward goals. A healthy narcissist can love because she’s learned to love herself.

Pathological narcissists, on the other hand, are toxic. “Narcissists who are pathological have very low self-esteem, so they require excessive amounts of admiration and cause suffering for other human beings,” says Dr. James Walsh, a licensed professional counselor of mental health and assistant professor for the M.S. Clinical Mental Health Counseling program in Wilmington University’s College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. (WilmU’s M.S. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is the only program in Delaware accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs.)

Pathological narcissists, herein referred to as narcissists, “are recognized by their need for social dominance, arrogance and sense of entitlement,” says Dr. Todd Grande, also a licensed professional counselor of mental health and an associate professor for the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program. “At the clinical level, those who exhibit extreme traits are diagnosed often with Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD).”

According to the &#;Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,&#; a product of the American Psychological Association, prevalence estimates for narcissistic personality disorder range from 0 to percent in community samples. The U.S. Census reports the U.S. population at more than million. This suggests that millions of people could fall prey to narcissists.

Whetherthroughmarriage, friendship or at work, a narcissist will probably blow through each of our lives. They won’t comprehend the destruction they left behind, nor will they recognize the need to apologize for it.

“Personality largely doesn’t change,” says Dr. Grande. “Normally what starts to change is a realization that someone needs to change and a narcissist never has that realization. So you’re left with changing yourself. We have to make our own adaptations to survive what is called narcissistic abuse.”

Which could be mitigated by reacquainting ourselves with the people we were before the abuse. Drs. Grande and Walsh believe there are ways to lessen narcissists’ control. Victims have to embrace change, and change is hard — until they decide definitively that everyone, including themselves, deserves happiness.

As Maya Angelou said: “You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.” The same is true of narcissists. You can’t avoid them, but you don’t have to be reduced by them either.

Suffering

Ebenezer Scrooge was the ultimate narcissist, saysDr. Walsh. (Scrooge is the protagonist and antagonist in Charles Dickens’s “A Christmas Carol.”) He has the perfect victim: his impoverished and compassionate assistant, Bob Cratchit, who today might be described as an empath, the narcissist’s polar opposite.

“Scrooge diminishes and ridicules Cratchit regularly, but Cratchit takes it in stride,” says Dr. Walsh. “He enjoys the richness of his family life and refuses to bring Scrooge into his happy home.” Cratchit can barely feed his kids yet holds no animosity toward the man who pays him.

This is fiction, of course. Ghosts have reportedly never visited a narcissist and facilitated his transformation into a benevolent person — overnight. In reality, Scrooge would not have changed. And Cratchit would’ve been thrown to the wolves the moment he stopped idealizing him.

Spouses quarreling at home, frustrated wife listen claims from angry husband, focus of female. Head shot married couple have bad difficult relations. Break up unexpected pregnancy and divorce conceptA narcissist “feels entitled to make all the decisions, even if they’re simply incorrect,” says Dr. Walsh. “They wield power with complete impunity. They’re so deserving of your admiration and so lacking in empathy that they get into a fantasy world. And in that world, they are never at fault with anything.”

Even a decent relationship with a narcissist can erode. “When they have someone in their life who’s really admiring of them, they think of them highly,” says Dr. Walsh. “But the moment that person disagrees with them, she will be proclaimed an idiot or moron, usually in a very public manner, leaving intact the narcissist’s damaged ego.”

“Narcissistic Personality Disorder bleeds over to the clinical arena when it’s extreme; when they display a highly exaggerated sense of superiority, grandiosity, fantasies of unlimited power, and the constant need for special treatment,” says Dr. Grande. “Their relationships tend to fail. They’re vulnerable to the slightest criticism, so if they’re challenged, they become unhinged.”

According to the Mayo Clinic, people with NPD present certain traits: They react with contempt and try to belittle others to make themselves appear superior. They can’t regulate their emotions, so they experience major problems dealing with stress and adapting to change. They become moody when they fall short of perfection.

Narcissists appear confident, but inside they’re extremely insecure, says Dr. Grande. “They feel shame, vulnerability and humiliation, and try to hide that by monopolizing conversations. With narcissism, we see other related traits. One of them is psychopathy, which is usually thought of as scary or serial killers, but most of the time it isn’t anything like that. Psychopathy can be subclinical, as can narcissism, and both have destructive characteristics.

“Within psychopathy is superficial charm. That means that narcissists, if they’re psychopathic, which often they would be subclinically, have very good initial presentations. They do well on interviews and with social situations where they greet people, smile and shake hands. What they lack is any depth or sensitivity. They build an efficient shell that mirrors what they see other extroverted people doing.”

They appear charming at first and people are drawn to their charisma — until their true colors pop. “Narcissists aren’t respected; they’re tolerated,” says Dr. Walsh. “That doesn’t mean they’re not good at what they do.”

In fact, adds Dr. Grande: “They’re often intelligent, productive people. They may do things so crucial that they can’t be replaced. They can have high conscientiousness. And being disagreeable can be an asset, depending on their professional roles.”

Perhaps most painful to people who become disillusioned by narcissistic spouses, parents, friends, coworkers or managers — anyone they once admired — is the realization that their relationships are built on shaky ground. In time, “their” narcissists will devalue them in order to feel good about themselves.

“They tend to leave behind a trail of broken relationships,” says Dr. Walsh, which he attributes largely to their lack of compassion. “Narcissists don’t have the emotional experiences most of us have when we feel empathy. If I walked into a room and you were tearful, I would feel something. The empathic behavior comes naturally and internally. Narcissists don’t get that feeling.”

Healing

Again, the stats suggest that millions of people could suffer narcissistic abuse. “But the number of victims would actually be higher if one were to consider vulnerable narcissists (not captured by the definition of NPD) and subclinical narcissists (not captured anywhere),” says Dr. Grande. “Given the prevalence of NPD — and the probability that it’ll only get worse — victims would be well served by learning to cope with them.”

Manager is shouting to employee after his mistake in the CEO officeThe first step involves personal space. Drs. Walsh and Grande agree that it’s critical to set boundaries, whether the relationship involves a spouse, friend or work colleague.

That’s not always possible, but Julie L. Hall, a regular contributor to The Huffington Post and author of “The Narcissist in Your Life,” offers suggestions: Document your feelings to become more self-aware; give yourself permission to say no; take time for yourself; and don’t become isolated. Seek support from a therapist to release feelings you’ve kept buried. She also notes the importance of being direct, so learn to communicate what you will and won’t do. (Sometimes difficult to do in a professional environment.) Finally, be patient with yourself. Healing takes time.

When you date a narcissist, you can call it quits. “But when people get married, it gets more complicated,” says Dr. Grande. “Couples believe it’s for the long term. Society demands that they intertwine financially and logistically; a wife may take a husband’s name, children may be involved. It’s a very engrained social construct. Even when a spouse discovers she’s married to a narcissist, leaving is not always a viable option. Narcissism alone actually dissolves very few marriages.”

Dr. Walsh adds that couples considering separation or divorce can choose counseling. “It’s possible for the narcissist in the relationship to become aware of his behavior. The disorder can be treated.” If narcissists can get to a point where they own their weaknesses, and that’s a big “if,” a mental health professional can offer strategies to help manage them. Professionals also can guide them in the realization that they’re not perfect and some things actually are their fault. Dr. Walsh says it’s a long and difficult journey — for both spouses — but possible.

Professional situations get tricky. “It’s about managing the narcissist, yes, but more often, being managed by the narcissist,” says Dr. Grande. “The narcissistic personality is driven toward self-aggrandizing efforts and sometimes that can be achieved through work. Because their social skills are so lacking, work is the one place where they can gain rank and status.”

Dr. Walsh says that you can manage up, but carefully; you’re dealing with a fragile ego. “A narcissist may feel entitled to call you at 4 a.m., and get an immediate response,” he adds. “She’s not going to have any sense that she doesn’t deserve to have you do that. If you respond without any pushback, it just reinforces her behavior. You can say, ‘It’s 4 a.m., and I’ll do this, but I’ll be coming in late.’ You’ll either earn respect or get fired. Making bold moves like this can be empowering, but they may come at
a cost.”

Victims tend to avoid confrontation. Like bullies, narcissists are better at it. They’ll argue till they win. Plus, they will undermine people once they target their weaknesses.

According to Dr. Leon F. Seltzer in his article for Psychology Today, “When approaching disagreements with a narcissist routinely results in feeling punished, you soon learn that to achieve any peace in the relationship, you’ll be required to keep your frustrations to yourself. And the manner in which most people accomplish this superficial harmony is through accommodating or pacifying them.”

Yet pacifying them too long can be psychologically devastating. “The narcissist may demand more of you than you can actually produce, and then if you fail, she’ll blame you,” says Dr. Grande.

It’s called gaslighting, and it’s one of the most effective strategies narcissists use to gradually manipulate people until they start to question their worth or sanity. Once she drags her victim to his lowest point, she’ll compliment him. It’s a power play; a game that keeps victims off-kilter and narcissists in control. (Gaslighting is also a common technique of abusers, dictators and cult leaders. Its name comes from the film “Gaslight,” about a woman whose husband slowly manipulates her into believing that she’s going insane.)

Healing starts when victims ditch the need to be right. If the narcissist insists he’s right, even when you know he’s not, let him win, counselors advise. He needs to be right more than you do. The object is to work hard and lose the resentment. In time, your work should speak for itself.

A set of skills called Resource Management Ability can help with job tension, adds Dr. Grande. “Sidestep the narcissist, whether she’s a coworker, client or manager, and find other ways to get your job done. Find people who will help make your job more efficient; learn to network; find other methods to do your job, like new software or webinars — if possible, at your own expense. Build alliances with non-narcissists who value your strengths. Talk to someone you trust. Sometimes it’s just a matter of being heard.”

“People who choose to stay in toxic relationships are not weak,” says Dr. Walsh. “They seek a higher purpose.” Maybe their love for their children cancels out divorce, or the narcissist-spouse is the major breadwinner. Sometimes people choose to serve an organization they honor and take the good with the bad.

“When you do stay in the relationship,” says Dr. Walsh, “keep in mind that the abuse is not about you. Having a narcissist work for you can be bad for your job longevity. Watch out from below!”

Living

Seek your source of self-knowledge and self-esteem from people who love you,” says Dr. Walsh. “Introspection is fine, but most of us come to know ourselves when we see how others perceive us. Live a healthy lifestyle — actually, live a good life.”

Then, once you’ve taken back your self-respect, you can do something outrageous: Have compassion. “Narcissists have often suffered severe mental or physical abuse,” says Dr. Grande. “It can be very sad to learn how a toxic personality developed.”

To paraphrase a report from Dr. Darryl Cross, a clinical and organizational psychologist at the Institute for Leadership Coaching in Australia, vulnerable types of narcissists had parents who lacked warmth and were highly critical and faultfinding. Narcissistic children develop an endearing sense of self to counteract feelings of inadequacy. Theirs is a lifelong journey to seek the praise and adulation they never got.

“It’s not what’s wrong with this person, it’s what happened to this person,” says Dr. Walsh. “If you look at someone’s case history, you can see that he or she never experienced unconditional love. That’s not to dismiss the agony narcissists cause; it’s just to say that their behavior is the manifestation of their life experiences.” Everyone gets disillusioned at some point; it’s how we handle it that matters.

It starts with forgiveness. “If you don’t practice forgiveness, you might be the one who pays most dearly,” according to researchers from the Mayo Clinic. “By embracing forgiveness, you can also embrace peace, hope, gratitude and joy. Consider how forgiveness can lead you down the path of physical, emotional and spiritual well-being.”

Cratchit had it right all along — or more accurately, Charles Dickens did. Arguably the greatest novelist of the Victorian era, Dickens was born in poverty. He had no formal education and worked in a factory. Critics say that his empathy for the poor likely inspired many of his characters.

So the lesson comes from his humble Cratchit: Leave the toxicity behind. No one has power over us unless we give it to them. The world is full of people who choose to honor others, not belittle them.

Most of all, find peace in a place you love, with the people you love.

That’s happiness.


Narcissistic Personality Inventory

The following quiz* was designed to quickly assess narcissistic traits and is not to be used as a substitute for clinical assessment. For a comprehensive and valid assessment, please see a licensed professional mental health counselor.

This quiz is for your eyes only, so be honest. It may help you recognize traits that affect others negatively.

For each of the following items, indicate whether the statement is mostly true or mostly false.

o Others have acknowledged that I am special or great

o I can talk my way out of problems

o Getting respect from others is crucial

o I will be famous someday

o I enjoy being the center of attention

o I am well-suited to be a leader

o Others are jealous of my talent

o Others can learn a lot from me

o I deserve the best of everything

o When I enter a room, I take charge right away

o Modesty is for underachievers

o If I am not in charge, problems are sure to arise

o People who criticize me are simply jealous

o I dream of being powerful and successful

o I get angry at those who don’t recognize my abilities

o I hang around with successful people

o I am confident that I can accomplish anything

o My leadership abilities inspire people

o It bothers me when ordinary people believe they are my equals

o When I am telling a story, everyone pays attention

Add 1 point for each mostly true response.

0 – 2: Low narcissism

3 – 5: Average narcissism

> 6: High narcissism

*The NPI is a self-report scale of narcissism rather than narcissistic personality disorder (Foster & Campbell, ).

Sours: https://blog.wilmu.edu/news//11/20/surviving-a-narcissist/
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True Crime Psychology and Personality, hosted by Dr. Todd Grande, dives deep into the pathology behind some of the most horrendous crimes and those who commit them. We discuss topics like narcissism, psychopathy, sociopathy, and antisocial personality disorder from a scientifically informed perspective. What is a narcissist? What makes a person develop narcissistic personality disorder or become a psychopath? How do you spot a sociopath? What signs can you look for to protect yourself from these dangerous personalities? It's not just about the stories, it's about the science and psychology behind them.

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10 Things that Narcissists Say - Narcissistic Statements and Corresponding Thoughts

True Crime Psychology and Personality: Narcissism, Psychopathy, and the Minds of Dangerous Criminals

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Sours: https://podnews.net/podcast/i94m0

Grande narcissist dr

Not at all. She either brought her knees up or apart, engaged in conversation with Alyosha, which apparently somehow caused her to flatten and spread her legs. And she herself did not notice it at all.

10 Subtle Signs of Narcissism Exposure

He was quite pleasant. With one hand, I slipped between my legs and touched the clitoris, already drenched in juices. This was noticed by the teacher and he reached for my little holes. I gasped when his slightly cool finger pressed on the anus, but did not move away.

Now discussing:

These sounds gave her a strange longing inside her and a desire for something sweet and inexpressibly pleasant. She knew that Kolya and his mother had sex, but she could not imagine how they always do THIS by an elegant and. Fit mother and a huge phlegmatic Kolya. Once she even decided to peep through the keyhole, but she saw nothing but something stirring in the dark.

Then she began to imagine herself in bed with someone very similar to Kolya.



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