Carbs in steak

Carbs in steak DEFAULT

Calories in Steak


Other User Submitted Calorie Info Matching: Steak

Flank Steak (1 oz)

Calories: 44, Fat: 2g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 6g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Flank Steak

Serving Size: 1 oz

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 43.7
  • Total Fat 2.1 g
  • Saturated Fat 0.9 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.8 g
  • Cholesterol 14.2 mg
  • Sodium 20.7 mg
  • Potassium 103.5 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
  • Sugars 0.0 g
  • Protein 5.8 g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 14.4 %
  • Vitamin B-6 6.1 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.2 %
  • Calcium 0.1 %
  • Copper 1.0 %
  • Folate 0.5 %
  • Iron 3.2 %
  • Magnesium 1.5 %
  • Manganese 0.2 %
  • Niacin 6.7 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 0.9 %
  • Phosphorus 5.6 %
  • Riboflavin 2.5 %
  • Selenium 7.4 %
  • Thiamin 2.1 %
  • Zinc 6.8 %
Porterhouse Steak (1 oz)

Calories: 44, Fat: 2g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 6g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Porterhouse Steak

Serving Size: 1 oz

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 44.2
  • Total Fat 2.0 g
  • Saturated Fat 0.7 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 1.0 g
  • Cholesterol 15.9 mg
  • Sodium 16.4 mg
  • Potassium 83.1 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
  • Sugars 0.0 g
  • Protein 6.0 g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 14.1 %
  • Vitamin B-6 6.0 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.2 %
  • Calcium 0.1 %
  • Copper 1.2 %
  • Folate 0.5 %
  • Iron 4.0 %
  • Magnesium 1.6 %
  • Manganese 0.2 %
  • Niacin 5.7 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 1.0 %
  • Phosphorus 5.4 %
  • Riboflavin 3.2 %
  • Selenium 5.0 %
  • Thiamin 2.1 %
  • Zinc 7.2 %
Beef, T-Bone Steak (1 oz)

Calories: 73, Fat: 5g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 7g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Beef, T-Bone Steak

Serving Size: 1 oz

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 73.1
  • Total Fat 4.9 g
  • Saturated Fat 0.5 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.6 g
  • Cholesterol 17.3 mg
  • Sodium 19.0 mg
  • Potassium 85.1 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
  • Sugars 0.0 g
  • Protein 6.8 g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 14.1 %
  • Vitamin B-6 6.0 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.2 %
  • Calcium 0.1 %
  • Copper 1.2 %
  • Folate 0.5 %
  • Iron 5.8 %
  • Magnesium 1.6 %
  • Manganese 0.2 %
  • Niacin 5.7 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 1.0 %
  • Phosphorus 5.4 %
  • Riboflavin 3.2 %
  • Selenium 4.1 %
  • Thiamin 2.1 %
  • Zinc 6.9 %
Steak, Sandwich Steak, (steak 'Um) 1 Steak (1 serving)

Calories: 120, Fat: 10g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 8g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Steak, Sandwich Steak, (steak 'Um) 1 Steak

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 120.0
  • Total Fat 10.0 g
  • Saturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Cholesterol 0.0 mg
  • Sodium 0.0 mg
  • Potassium 0.0 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
  • Sugars 0.0 g
  • Protein 8.0 g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-6 0.0 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.0 %
  • Calcium 0.0 %
  • Copper 0.0 %
  • Folate 0.0 %
  • Iron 0.0 %
  • Magnesium 0.0 %
  • Manganese 0.0 %
  • Niacin 0.0 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 0.0 %
  • Phosphorus 0.0 %
  • Riboflavin 0.0 %
  • Selenium 0.0 %
  • Thiamin 0.0 %
  • Zinc 0.0 %
No Name Steak Boneless Beef Sirolin Steak (1 Steak) (1 oz)

Calories: 33, Fat: 1g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 5g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in No Name Steak Boneless Beef Sirolin Steak (1 Steak)

Serving Size: 1 oz

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 32.9
  • Total Fat 1.4 g
  • Saturated Fat 0.6 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Cholesterol 11.4 mg
  • Sodium 105.7 mg
  • Potassium 0.0 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 0.3 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
  • Sugars 0.3 g
  • Protein 4.9 g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-6 0.0 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.0 %
  • Calcium 0.0 %
  • Copper 0.0 %
  • Folate 0.0 %
  • Iron 3.6 %
  • Magnesium 0.0 %
  • Manganese 0.0 %
  • Niacin 0.0 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 0.0 %
  • Phosphorus 0.0 %
  • Riboflavin 0.0 %
  • Selenium 0.0 %
  • Thiamin 0.0 %
  • Zinc 0.0 %
Steak- Philly Steak Beef Sandwich Steak (1 serving)

Calories: 120, Fat: 10g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 8g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Steak- Philly Steak Beef Sandwich Steak

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 120.0
  • Total Fat 10.0 g
  • Saturated Fat 4.0 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Cholesterol 30.0 mg
  • Sodium 35.0 mg
  • Potassium 0.0 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
  • Sugars 0.0 g
  • Protein 8.0 g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-6 0.0 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.0 %
  • Calcium 0.0 %
  • Copper 0.0 %
  • Folate 0.0 %
  • Iron 0.0 %
  • Magnesium 0.0 %
  • Manganese 0.0 %
  • Niacin 0.0 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 0.0 %
  • Phosphorus 0.0 %
  • Riboflavin 0.0 %
  • Selenium 0.0 %
  • Thiamin 0.0 %
  • Zinc 0.0 %
Steak Eze Sirloin Beef Steak Philly Style Steak (1 serving)

Calories: 220, Fat: 16g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 19g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Steak Eze Sirloin Beef Steak Philly Style Steak

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 220.0
  • Total Fat 16.0 g
  • Saturated Fat 6.0 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Cholesterol 70.0 mg
  • Sodium 45.0 mg
  • Potassium 0.0 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
  • Sugars 0.0 g
  • Protein 19.0 g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-6 0.0 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.0 %
  • Calcium 0.0 %
  • Copper 0.0 %
  • Folate 0.0 %
  • Iron 10.0 %
  • Magnesium 0.0 %
  • Manganese 0.0 %
  • Niacin 0.0 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 0.0 %
  • Phosphorus 0.0 %
  • Riboflavin 0.0 %
  • Selenium 0.0 %
  • Thiamin 0.0 %
  • Zinc 0.0 %
Great Am. Steak Co. Steak Ribeye Steak (1 oz)

Calories: 1, Fat: 0g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 0g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Great Am. Steak Co. Steak Ribeye Steak

Serving Size: 1 oz

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 1.4
  • Total Fat 0.4 g
  • Saturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Cholesterol 0.0 mg
  • Sodium 0.0 mg
  • Potassium 0.0 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
  • Sugars 0.0 g
  • Protein 0.4 g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-6 0.0 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.0 %
  • Calcium 0.0 %
  • Copper 0.0 %
  • Folate 0.0 %
  • Iron 0.0 %
  • Magnesium 0.0 %
  • Manganese 0.0 %
  • Niacin 0.0 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 0.0 %
  • Phosphorus 0.0 %
  • Riboflavin 0.0 %
  • Selenium 0.0 %
  • Thiamin 0.0 %
  • Zinc 0.0 %
Steak Umm Steak - 1 Steak (1 serving)

Calories: 120, Fat: 10g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 8g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Steak Umm Steak - 1 Steak

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories 120.0
  • Total Fat 10.0 g
  • Saturated Fat 4.0 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
  • Cholesterol 30.0 mg
  • Sodium 35.0 mg
  • Potassium 0.0 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
  • Sugars 0.0 g
  • Protein 8.0 g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
  • Vitamin B-6 0.0 %
  • Vitamin C 0.0 %
  • Vitamin D 0.0 %
  • Vitamin E 0.0 %
  • Calcium 0.0 %
  • Copper 0.0 %
  • Folate 0.0 %
  • Iron 4.0 %
  • Magnesium 0.0 %
  • Manganese 0.0 %
  • Niacin 0.0 %
  • Pantothenic Acid 0.0 %
  • Phosphorus 0.0 %
  • Riboflavin 0.0 %
  • Selenium 0.0 %
  • Thiamin 0.0 %
  • Zinc 0.0 %

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Ingredient Specific Calorie Information From Our Recipes:

  • Calories In BBQ Steak Wrap

    Calories: 406, Fat: 11g, Carbs: 45g, Protein: 32g, Fiber: 9g

  • Calories In Marinated Flank Steak

    Calories: 215, Fat: 12g, Carbs: 3g, Protein: 24g, Fiber: 1g

  • Calories In Slow Cooker Pepper Steak

    Calories: 205, Fat: 7g, Carbs: 10g, Protein: 24g, Fiber: 2g

  • Calories In Peppercorn Steak with Herbed Blue Cheese

    Calories: 246, Fat: 18g, Carbs: 1g, Protein: 19g, Fiber: 0g

  • Calories In Grilled Garlic Citrus Flank Steak

    Calories: 231, Fat: 13g, Carbs: 4g, Protein: 24g, Fiber: 0g

Popular Calories Burned Searches:

Sours: https://www.sparkpeople.com/calories-in.asp?food=steak

Ribeye Steak

Steak Express, 12 oz

Calories: 780 •Carbs: 0g •Fat: 39g •Protein: 0g

Cheeseburger

Steak Express, 0.5 lb

Calories: 854 •Carbs: 23g •Fat: 52g •Protein: 19g

Philly Express

Steak Express, 1 Sandwich

Calories: 602 •Carbs: 60g •Fat: 24g •Protein: 37g

Sirloin Steak

Steak Express, 10 oz

Calories: 440 •Carbs: 0g •Fat: 20g •Protein: 0g

meat

steak express, 100 g

Calories: 225 •Carbs: 2g •Fat: 17g •Protein: 16g

Chicken

Steak Express, 5 oz.

Calories: 249 •Carbs: 0g •Fat: 6g •Protein: 0g

Sauteed Mushroom

Steak Express, 2.5 oz

Calories: 21 •Carbs: 2g •Fat: 0g •Protein: 0g

Angus Steak

Panda Express, 5.4 oz

Calories: 180 •Carbs: 10g •Fat: 7g •Protein: 19g

Hibachi Steak

Sake Express, 1 entree

Calories: 451 •Carbs: 2g •Fat: 32g •Protein: 37g

Grilled Chicken

Steak Express, 5 oz

Calories: 249 •Carbs: 0g •Fat: 6g •Protein: 48g

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Recipes & Inspiration

Sours: https://www.myfitnesspal.com/nutrition-facts-calories/steak-express
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How Many Carbs and Calories Are in Steak?

There aren’t a significant amount of carbs in steak.

Image Credit: Ryan Benyi Photography/Cultura/GettyImages

Thinking about a big, juicy steak dinner? If you're wondering how many carbs are in steak and the number of calories you'll be eating, here's what you need to know.

Tip

There aren’t significant amounts of carbs in steak. The number of calories depends on the type of steak, its fat content and how it is cooked; lean cuts have the least fat and calories and are the healthiest.

Steak’s Calorie Count Varies

Most people are referring to beef steaks when they use the term steak, however steak could actually be referring to any cut of meat, including lamb, pork, fish and chicken.

Regardless of which type of meat you choose, most of the steak's calories come from its protein and fat content, because meat isn't a significant source of carbs, as noted by Harvard Health Publishing. The amount of carbs in steak are often therefore either zero, or very low, making steaks compatible with low-carb diets like the keto diet.

As for the steak's calorie content, it can vary quite a bit depending on the type of meat, how much fat it has and how it is cooked. For example, poultry and fish are generally considered to be the leanest forms of meat, however a small August 2015 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition notes that there are some lean cuts of red meats like beef and pork as well.

Unfortunately, when it comes to beef steaks, a February 2015 study published in the journal Meat Science concluded that the tastiest cuts of steak are considered to be the ones with the most fat. The Mayo Clinic notes that these cuts are usually prime cuts and they tend to be the most expensive.

The cooking method also makes a difference to your steak's calorie count. For instance, a steak that has had the fat trimmed off and has been cooked with a little olive oil, salt and pepper will have a considerably lower calorie count than a steak that is cooked without trimming off the fat, in a rich sauce.

Just to give you some examples, these are the calorie counts of some popular steaks. A 4-ounce serving of tri-tip steak has 228 calories. A 4-ounce serving of New York strip steak has 250 calories. A 4-ounce serving of beef brisket has 327.6 calories.

Trimming the Calories in Steak

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend opting for lean protein when possible to help you limit your consumption of cholesterol, saturated fat and calories. Follow these tips to help lower the calorie content of your steak dinner.

Apart from fish and chicken, lean cuts of meat include the round, chuck, sirloin and tenderloin when it comes to beef, according to the Mayo Clinic. Tenderloin, loin chop and leg are among the leanest cuts of lamb and pork. When you buy the meat, look for cuts that have more than 90 percent of lean meat. Avoid prime beef and opt for choice or select beef instead, since they have less fat.

The Mayo Clinic also advises trimming off all the fat before you cook the meat. You can soak the meat in a low-fat marinade as well, like our Fresh Mango Marinade, to help tenderize it and make up for any flavor that was lost by trimming the fat. After you cook the meat, instead of incorporating the fat into the gravy, blot it off with a paper towel.

Sours: https://www.livestrong.com/article/309715-how-many-carbs-calories-are-in-steak/
Top Nutrition Facts and Health Effects of Beef

Before we dive in here, I need to give a HUGE shoutout and thank you to “Beef- It’s What’s For Dinner” for working with me to get accurate nutrition facts and images for each cut of meat. If you need any more info about specific steaks, their website is the place to go!

In my search for accurate nutrition information for this post, I found many varying results for how many calories each cut of steak contains. Some sources show much higher calorie counts and fat content than I’ll be displaying here.

I was very surprised to see that these cuts are all pretty lean. These are up-to-date numbers reviewed and approved by the USDA, so don’t you worry about the accuracy!

Over the years, the demand for leaner cuts has increased, and these reflect the new standard trims you’ll find in retail.

Of course, you may come across different trims and levels of fat for each steak depending on where you are. Some restaurants may leave more fat on your Porterhouse for added flavor, as an example. But if you cut those fat caps off (which most tend to do) the remaining trimmed portion will be similar to the numbers you’ll find here in this breakdown.

 

What is a portion size of steak?

Filet Mignon is surely not the same size as a giant T-Bone Steak, so how do you accurately assess a serving size?

For our purposes, we’re viewing a portion size as 3 ounces of COOKED steak.

That’s roughly the size of your phone or your palm. Here is a handy (pun intended) guide to help you estimate the portion size:

Visual portion size guide

I have a whole post about weight conversions for cooked vs raw meat, but to summarize: meat loses about 25% of its weight once cooked. So, 3 ounces of cooked steak will equate to roughly 4 ounces of raw steak.

If you buy steak from the grocery store, the nutrition facts will display information for 4 ounces of raw steak, so that is exactly what we’re looking at here.

The calories and nutrition for 4 ounces of raw steak are the same as for 3 ounces of cooked steak. The difference in weight is strictly due to a loss of water weight, so nothing else changes!

If you go to a restaurant and order a steak, the sizes will vary greatly. It will totally depend on the type of steak you order, but generally speaking, expect a portion to be about 8-10 ounces, or about 2 servings that you’ll see listed here.

 

Can you eat steak on a diet?

Juicy Steak

Short answer: of course!

There are a lot of misconceptions that red meat is terrible for your cholesterol, and it’s not typically thought of as a weight-loss food.

When people think of steak, they often think of it as something you eat if you’re trying to get big and strong. Not something to eat if you’re trying to lose weight.

But, as you can see by this guide, steak can actually be a great option while on a diet. While not every cut of meat is the same, as long as the steaks are trimmed, they are quite lean. With no carbs, relatively low fat, and high protein, steaks are a great option if weight loss is the goal.

Sure, the saturated fat & cholesterol in red meat may not be the ideal “diet food,” and it may not be as lean as grilled chicken, but as with anything else, moderation is always the key. Unless you’re turning to the Carnivore Diet (please don’t), you don’t need to worry about having some red meat for dinner when you want it!

 

How many calories are in an average steak?

Remember, we’re going to look at 3 ounces of cooked steak here. When you compare equal-sized portions, you can predict that average steak calories per serving will be around 160 calories.

If you want to swipe through a web story version of this post, check that out here.

Steak Nutrition Guide

And while we won’t be diving beyond the calories & macronutrients, it’s important to note that steak also provides quite a bit of nutrients!

While it’s no secret that steak is high in protein, it’s also quite high in Vitamin B12, Zinc, Selenium, Iron, Niacin, and more (check out my Vitamin & Mineral Guide for more).

 

Filet Mignon

170 Calories, 7g Fat, 0g Carbs, 26g Protein

Also Known As: Beef Loin, Tenderloin Steak, Side Muscle Off, Skinned; Chateaubriand Filet De Boeuf; Filet Mignon

Tenderloin is the most tender cut of steak you can get, which is why you’ll find it being so expensive! With very little fat, this is an incredibly healthy, lean option.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Flank Steak Calories

Flank Steak

160 Calories, 6g Fat, 0g Carbs, 23g Protein

Also Known As: Beef Flank; Flank Steak Filet; Jiffy Steak; Plank Steak

Flank Steak is very thin, making it best for stir-frying! Flank steak is very long, but also very flavorful, making it a great choice when you have a recipe that calls for sliced beef.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

Flat Iron Steak

Flat Iron Steak

180 Calories, 9g Fat, 0g Carbs, 23g Protein

Also Known As: Boneless Top Chuck Steak; Book Steak; Butler Steak

The Flat Iron Steak comes from the chuck (shoulder), where some of the most flavorful beef comes from. The Flat Iron Steak is actually the second most tender cut (after the tenderloin), which makes it a great choice for grilling.

Eye of Round

130 Calories, 3g Fat, 0g Carbs, 25g Protein

Also Known As: Breakfast Steak; Sandwich Steak; Wafer Steak

If you’re looking for a low-fat option, look no further than the Eye of Round! This cut comes from the hind legs, which are very lean and less tender. These steaks are less ideal for grilling, but great for roasts or as ground beef!

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

Porterhouse

180 Calories, 9g Fat, 0g Carbs, 24g Protein

Also Known As: 1st Cut Porterhouse; King Steak; Porter House

Ah, the infamous Porterhouse Steak. If you’re looking for a big, meaty steak to order at a restaurant, this is definitely it. Since these steaks are so large, it is usually a perfect dinner to feed two people!

A Porterhouse is very similar to a T-Bone steak, but the Porterhouse has a larger tenderloin muscle. Nutritionally, you’ll find both very similar.

Bone-In Ribeye

190 Calories, 10g Fat, 0g Carbs, 23g Protein

Also Known As: Ribeye Roll Steak; Ribeye Steak, 1″ Tail; Ribeye Steak, 2″ Tail; Ribeye Steak, Lip-On, Boneless

A Ribeye Steak is rich, juicy and full of flavor. Definitely one of the more popular cuts for grilling! The fat content is higher than other cuts of steak, but you’ll find that to be standard with any bone-in meat, because there is quite a bit of fat around the bone.

Ribeye Filet

170 Calories, 8g Fat, 0g Carbs, 24g Protein

Also Known As: Ribeye Petite Steak; Saratoga Steak

If you want a Ribeye, but want something slightly leaner, Ribeye Filets are where it’s at. Fun fact: the name “Filet” is a French word meaning “a solid piece of meat.”

 

Skirt Steak

200 Calories, 11g Fat, 0g Carbs, 25g Protein

Also Known As: Arrachera; Fajita Meat; Fajita Steak; Skirt Steak

Have you ever had fajitas? Of course you have! And if you’ve specifically had steak fajitas, then you’ve enjoyed yourself some Skirt Steak. Skirt Steak is a thin, flavorful cut (due to the higher amounts of fat) that works best seared over high heat. Ya know, like fajitas!

 

Strip Steak

160 Calories, 6g Fat, 0g Carbs, 25g Protein

Also Known As: Ambassador Steak; Club Steak; Hotel Cut Steak; Kansas City Strip Steak; New York Strip Steak; Shell Steak; Top Loin Steak

Another steak that is great for grilling! With only 6g of fat per serving, the Strip Steak is a great option to enjoy, especially due to the slightly lower price tag.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

T-Bone Steak

180 Calories, 9g Fat, 0g Carbs, 23g Protein

Also Known As: Loin, T-Bone Steak; T-Bone

T-Bones are seemingly the go-to steak in movies or on TV. If you were asked to draw a steak, a big T-Bone is probably the first thing to comes to mind.

T-Bone steaks are very similar to Porterhouse steaks, but generally slightly smaller!

 

Top Sirloin

150 Calories, 5g Fat, 0g Carbs, 26g Protein

Also Known As: Boneless Top Sirloin Steak ; Top Sirloin Butt Steak, Boneless; Top Sirloin Center-Cut Steak; Top Sirloin Steak Boneless Cap Off; Top Sirloin Steak Cap Off

Sirloin Steak is one of my personal favorites! It’s full of flavor, but still very lean, making it great for grilling. If I don’t feel like spending money on a tenderloin, this is the next-best thing!

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Tri Tip Steak Calorie

Tri-Tip

220 Calories, 13g Fat, 0g Carbs, 25g Protein

Also Known As: Newport Steak; Santa Maria Steak; Tri Tip; Triangle Steak

Tri-Tip Steak is NOT the same thing as Steak Tips, I came to learn! Steak Tips are one of my absolute favorite ways to enjoy steak- they’re basically lean cuts off the tip of the sirloin, and they’re magical.

Tri-Tip is a specific cut of sirloin, with its triangular shape giving it its name. In doing some research, I learned that it is actually very popular in California. Being a New Yorker myself, this is news to me, but I’m sure a ton of you reading this already knew that.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Summary: how healthy is steak?

I’ll be honest: growing up, I thought all steak was unhealthy. I saw all those huge, fatty steaks (like T-Bones) and knew that there was no way they could be healthy.

But after doing my own research and learning more about steak, it quickly became obvious to me that steak can be a GREAT option! Sure, not all cuts of meat are the same. And while this guide shows some very lean meat, if you’re ordering steak, there is going to be much more fat involved.

At a restaurant, they may not do all the trimming because they want to leave those juicy “fat caps” on the steak. This helps the overall flavor (since fat melts a bit when cooked), but the odds are that you’re not eating that entire fat cap. So, hopefully this guide can help you get a solid understanding of the nutrition you are actually consuming with each steak!

Sours: https://cheatdaydesign.com/steak-nutrition-guide/

In steak carbs

Steak Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Steak might not be the first food to come to mind when putting together a healthy menu. Although red meat has been associated with muscle-building for quite some time, concerns about heart health leave many people unsure about whether or not steak can be a healthy addition to their diet.

In moderation, steak provides benefits that can help meet your nutritional needs. Replacing processed meats with freshly cooked steak (especially when it's grass-fed) is a good step towards improving your eating habits.

Steak Nutrition Facts

The fat and protein content of steak will vary depending on the cut of meat and how it's prepared. The following nutrition information is provided by the USDA for 3 ounces (85g) of grilled beef tenderloin, with the fat trimmed.

  • Calories: 179
  • Fat: 7.6g
  • Sodium: 60mg
  • Carbohydrates: 0g
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Sugars: 0g
  • Protein: 26g

Carbs

Steak is naturally free of carbohydrates, including sugar and fiber.

Fats

Steak can be made leaner by trimming the fat before cooking and choosing leaner cuts of meat. Beef contains a mix of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. As opposed to grain-fed beef, grass-fed beef is lower in total fat and has a more favorable fatty acid profile.

Remember that cooking method will also influence nutritional values. For example, cooking steak with butter adds 100 calories and 11 grams of fat for every tablespoon of butter used.

Protein

Steak is an excellent source of high-quality protein. As with other animal proteins, beef is a complete protein and offers all of the essential amino acids required by the body.

Vitamins and Minerals

Beef is a good source of vitamin B12, niacin, selenium, iron, and zinc. Grass-fed beef is higher in the precursors to vitamins A and E than conventionally grown grain-fed beef.

Health Benefits

Eating enough protein is essential, and steak is an excellent source. Research shows that unprocessed meats, like steak, are superior choices when compared to processed meat.

Reduces Muscle Wasting

Sarcopenia is the natural loss of muscle with age. Loss of muscle leads to a higher risk of injury and reduced independence for seniors. Studies have shown that animal protein intake is associated with higher retention of muscle mass, even in older adults who do not exercise. Keeping steak on the menu for older adults may help preserve muscle mass and functioning.

Aids Immunity

Beef offers protein and zinc, two essential nutrients for the immune system. Along with washing your hands and eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, a moderate portion of steak can provide nutritional support for fending off colds and viruses.

Lowers Risk of Anemia

Steak provides iron and vitamin B12 which are crucial for the prevention of anemia. Symptoms of anemia include fatigue, dizziness, shortness of breath, paleness, headaches, and cold hands and feet. Consuming iron-rich foods, like steak, can help prevent anemia for most people.

Provides a Heart Healthier Option

Despite assumptions from the past, it appears that red meat alone is not the cause of heart disease. Studies show that processed meats pose a greater threat to heart health than freshly prepared meats, like steak.

Although you shouldn't necessarily increase your intake of red meat, choosing steak instead of lunch meats, for instance, is a beneficial change with less sodium and preservatives. Balancing your intake of steak with heart-healthy fruits and vegetables will also reduce your risks.

May Prevent Diabetes

Similarly, processed meats appear to cause a greater risk of type 2 diabetes than unprocessed meats, like steak. While a meal plan based on seafood, nuts, beans, fruits, and vegetables is preferable to eating lots of red meat, choosing steak instead of cured bacon or processed chicken nuggets appears to be a positive step for disease prevention.

Allergies

Meat allergies are uncommon, but a strange reaction after tick bites has been shown to produce IgE-mediated reactions to red meat. Severe hypersensitivity symptoms, including anaphylaxis, sometimes appear as a delayed meat allergy. If you notice allergy symptoms from eating steak, contact your doctor for a full evaluation.

Adverse Effects

The American Heart Association recommends limiting your intake of saturated fats to about 13 grams per day. While steak generally has less fat than ground beef, it still contributes to your total daily intake. Watch portion sizes and consume leaner cuts of steak to avoid elevating your cholesterol levels.

Varieties

Steaks come in different varieties based on the cut of meat. Higher fat percentages produce more tender cuts of meat. Meat quality is graded by the USDA as Prime, Choice, and Select. This grading system is intended to help consumers determine the quality and expected yield of meat.

  • Prime beef is sold in restaurants. It has lots of marbling and comes from well-fed, young cattle. Dry-heat cooking methods (like grilling, roasting, and broiling) works well for Prime cuts.
  • Choice beef has less marbling but is still high-quality. Dry cooking Choice beef is fine as long as it's not overcooked. Choice beef may be prepared by simmering or braising as well.
  • Select beef is leaner than Prime and Choice. It's usually marinated to preserve tenderness.

Studies have shown that muscles from the chuck are more desirable than the round. Leaner varieties of steak can be tenderized with certain preparation methods, like marinating and slicing it thin. Because beef gets leaner as it goes from Prime to Select, the protein content goes up and the fat content goes down.

Select beef has 5% to 20% less fat than the same cut of Choice beef. Compared to Prime, Select beef has up to 40% less fat. Much of the beef sold in grocery stores is ungraded or considered to be Commercial grade (one level below Select). Although the USDA's grading system favors fattier cuts of beef, you can still create a flavorful and healthy steak from leaner cuts by using the right preparation methods.

Storage and Food Safety

Always wash your hands before and after handling raw meat. Keep raw steaks apart from other foods in the refrigerator to avoid spreading dangerous bacteria. Use separate utensils and cutting boards for raw meat and wash them well in hot, soapy water after use.

Cooking beef to the proper temperature kills bacteria that can be especially harmful for pregnant women and people with compromised immune systems. Beef steaks must be cooked to 145 degrees Fahrenheit and let to rest for 3 minutes before eating or carving (ground beef should be cooked to 160 degrees).

How to Prepare

Trim visible fat off of steak before prepping it. You can also ask your butcher to trim the fat or buy steaks that already have the extra fat removed. Choose a lean cooking method such as broiling, grilling, or roasting for a healthier meal. Keep portion control in mind—a single serving of steak is just 3 ounces. Prepare steak as part of a stir-fry dish with vegetables and teriyaki sauce, or fajitas with spices and lots of vegetables to create balanced meals.

Recipes

Healthy Steak Recipes to Try

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Beef, loin, tenderloin steak, boneless, separable lean only, trimmed to 0" fat, choice, cooked, grilled. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  2. Daley CA, Abbott A, Doyle PS, Nader GA, Larson S. A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef. Nutr J. 2010;9:10. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-9-10

  3. U.S. Department of Agriculture. FoodData Central. Updated February 26, 2021.

  4. Cleveland Clinic. Do I Need to Worry About Eating ‘Complete’ Proteins? March 12, 2019.

  5. Bradlee ML, Mustafa J, Singer MR, Moore LL. High-protein foods and physical activity protect against age-related muscle loss and functional decline. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017;73(1):88-94. doi:10.1093/gerona/glx070

  6. How to keep your immune system healthy. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Updated 2018.

  7. Avoiding anemia boost your red blood cells. NIH News in Health. Updated 2014.

  8. Micha R, Michas G, Mozaffarian D. Unprocessed red and processed meats and risk of coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes--an updated review of the evidence. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2012;14(6):515-24. doi:10.1007/s11883-012-0282-8

  9. Pisazka V, Duscher G, Hodžić A, Reider N, Allerberger F. Alpha-gal allergy after a tick bite in Austria. Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2019;131(15-16):385-388. doi:10.1007/s00508-019-1506-5

  10. Saturated fat. American Heart Association. Updated 2020.

  11. Meadows L. What's your beef - prime, choice or select?. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Updated 2019.

  12. Nyquist KM, O'quinn TG, Drey LN, et al. Palatability of beef chuck, loin, and round muscles from three USDA quality grades. J Anim Sci. 2018;96(10):4276-4292. doi:10.1093/jas/sky305

  13. A fresh look at beef. Berkeley Wellness University of California. Updated 2016.

  14. Food safety risks for pregnant women. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Updated 2018.

Sours: https://www.verywellfit.com/the-best-ways-to-eat-steak-on-a-diet-3495219
30 minute Low Carb Steak Dinner for two

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