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The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Guide & Walkthrough Wiki

The Legend of Zelda Link

Welcome to the Walkthrough Wiki of The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (Remake) for the Nintendo Switch. Story and dungeon walkthroughs, side quests, maps, items, as well as enemy information for Link's Awakening and more can all be found here. Read on for tips and strategies that will help you progress through the game.

Link's Awakening Story Walkthrough

Stroy Walkthrough
Story Walkthrough

Link's Awakening Side Quests

SIde Quests
Side Quests

Link's Awakening - Mini Games

Mini Games
Mini-Games

Link's Awakening - Enemies

Enemies

List of All Enemies

Link's Awakening - Items

Items

All Items and Equipment

Link's Awakening - Maps and Locations

Maps and Locations

Koholint Island Maps and Locations

Link's Awakening - Useful Information

Useful Info

Useful Information and Tips

Link's Awakening - Speedrun Guides

Speedrunning Guides

Speedrunning Guide

What Kind of Game is The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening?

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening

Relive the Exciting Storyline

Koholint Island - Link
Stranded on Koholint Island after surviving a shipwreck, join Link as he discovers the secrets and mysteries of the Wind Fish to escape the Island.

New Features and Contents

Chamber Dungeon - Link
Link's Awakening for Nintendo Switch has several new features that were not available on previous versions. Build your own dungeons with Chamber Dungeons and enjoy upgraded versions of the classic mini-games!

Exciting Dungeons

Color Dungeon Header.jpg
You will have explore various dungeons where you will encounter a wide variet of enemies. Use dungeon items to clear the path and solve the many puzzles!

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The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening

This article is about the 2019 Switch game. For the 1993 Game Boy game, see Link's Awakening (Game Boy). For the 1998 Game Boy Color game, see Link's Awakening DX.

Link's Awakening (Switch)

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The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is a remake of the 1993 game of the same name. Announced during a Nintendo Direct presentation on February 13th, 2019[1], the game received a short teaser trailer. During E3 2019, a worldwide release date of September 20th, 2019 was shown. The game has received a massive overhaul in the graphics department, although the overworld is largely unchanged gameplay-wise. Aspects of Link's Awakening DX are also included, such as the Color Dungeon, though the Camera Shop does not appear, as it is replaced by Dampé's Shack.

Story

Main article: Link's Awakening Story

After defeating Ganon in A Link to the Past, Link decides to go on a journey to prepare himself in case such an evil returns. During this journey, Link's ship falls prey to a storm. Link wakes up on the beach of the mysterious island of Koholint, where he must gather eight instruments in order to wake the Wind Fish sleeping atop Mt. Tamaranch and leave the island.

Graphics

The game's art-style has radically changed, creating a much more modern look, with high-resolution models and shaders present. There is a blur effect on the edges of the screen, though only when Link is in the overworld. The character models appear to have a chibi look, almost reminiscent of toys.

Changes

  • Link is now able to attack diagonally, as opposed to the original, where he could only swing his sword in four set directions. This is the same for overworld movement.
  • Several items get dedicated buttons - Sword¸ Hylian Shield, Pegasus Boots, Power Bracelet - and no longer need to be equipped from the pause menu. You still need to collect the items to make their function available.
  • While almost everything in the world shown thus far is identical, a ledge can now be seen on top of Kanalet Castle, allowing Link to jump off. This is a quality of life improvement, allowing quick access for Link to leave the castle, as opposed to having to backtrack through the dungeon, as was required beforehand[2]. The entrance to Bottle Grotto has one of the flowers replaced with a heavy rock, making it possible to re-enter the dungeon after returning BowWow.
  • Apple trees appear in the overworld, which Link can run in to, causing them to drop. They can be eaten, functioning as Recovery Hearts[3].
  • A new item, the Fairy Bottle, appears in the game. It "looks big enough to hold a Fairy inside"[4]. One can be found at the bottom of the Fishing Pond, another is given to Link from Dampé after completing a Chamber Dungeon, a third is given when completing the lonely ghost quest.
  • Some keys no longer drop from the ceiling in dungeons; a chest holding the key will appear instead[5].
  • There are now 20 Heart Containers in the game, six more than in the original version. Certain Pieces of Heart have also been shifted in location.
  • The number of Secret Seashells has increased from 26 to 50, none of which is missable.
  • The Fishing minigame has been given a larger variety of fish over time.
  • The Trendy Game has been extended to give various trophies as possible prizes. These figurines can be placed in some houses in Mabe Village.
  • The Rapids Ride game has an additional racing mode.
  • There are additional warp points added. Also, Song 2 will let you choose which warp point to warp to from any overworld location.
  • If you finish Level 5 before Level 4, you no longer skip the lonely ghost quest.
  • Stealing from the shop is now much more difficult.
  • The chess piece horse head puzzle is no longer random, but rather has a specific technique.
  • Cuccos and Mutts are now truly invincible. Neither Magic Powder nor the Magic Rod kills our animal friends.

New Features

Chamber Dungeons

Main article: Chamber Dungeon

These are customizable dungeons accessed by speaking to Dampé in his shack, located where the Camera Shop was in Link's Awakening DX (West Tal Tal Heights). Dampé presents Link with various challenges, which require him to arrange chambers from previously explored dungeons to create a new dungeon in a specific shape. Chamber Dungeons must have an entrance room, Nightmare's Lair, and all doors must connect. There also must be enough chests holding keys to be able to unlock every locked door or block. If there is more than one stairway in the dungeon, Link must choose which ones will connect. Link can earn various items as reward, including Rupees, and a Fairy Bottle. There is a timer, which counts up; it is unknown whether completing challenges in certain time brackets affects the reward given[6].

amiibo

File:link-la-amiibo.png
Main article: amiibo

One amiibo is to be released with the game, based on Link's new appearance. All Legend of Zelda amiibo are usable in the game, and they each provide different Plus Effects in the Chamber Dungeon, adding new gameplay elements to the rooms of the dungeon. The Link's Awakening Link amiibo adds Shadow Link to the dungeon, who will follow Link through the rooms. Defeating Shadow Link will reward Link with additional Rupees[7].

Characters

Main article: Link's Awakening Characters

The majority of characters return in this remake, one notable exception being the Photographer. Recurring character Dampé appears in their place, allowing Link to access the Chamber Dungeons and their challenges.

Enemies

Main article: Link's Awakening Enemies

All the enemies that have appeared thus far are found in the exact same locations where they appeared in the original, with significant overhauls to their game models.

Instruments of the Sirens

Main article: Instruments of the Sirens
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    Full Moon Cello

  • La19-conch.png

    Conch Horn

  • La19-bell.png

    Sea Lily's Bell

  • La19-harp.png

    Surf Harp

  • La19-marimba.png

    Wind Marimba

  • La19-triangle.png

    Coral Triangle

  • La19-organ.png

    Organ of Evening Calm

  • La19-drum.png

    Thunder Drum

Gallery

Main article: Gallery:Link's Awakening

Scene art

Characters

See also: Gallery:Link's Awakening Characters

Enemies

See also: Gallery:Link's Awakening Bosses and Gallery:Link's Awakening Enemies
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Trailer Screenshots

Nintendo Direct February 2019

E3 2019

Videos


Nintendo Direct Reveal Trailer 02-13-19


E3 2019 Trailer 06-11-19


E3 Nintendo Treehouse: Live Gameplay 06-11-19

References

  1. ↑ Nintendo Direct Reveal Trailer 02-13-2019
  2. ↑ Nintendo Direct Reveal Trailer 02-13-2019 (1:05)
  3. ↑ E3 2019 Trailer 06-11-2019 (0:45)
  4. ↑ E3 2019 Trailer 06-11-2019 (1:56)
  5. ↑ E3 Nintendo Treehouse: Live Gameplay 06-11-19 (22:35)
  6. ↑ E3 Nintendo Treehouse: Live Gameplay 06-11-19 (15:16)
  7. ↑ E3 Nintendo Treehouse: Live Gameplay 06-11-19 (29:24)
Sours: https://www.zeldadungeon.net/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Link%27s_Awakening
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The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening

1993 action-adventure video game published by Nintendo

This article is about the original 1993 video game. For the remake, see The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (2019 video game).

1993 video game

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening[a] is a 1993 action-adventure game developed and published by Nintendo for the Game Boy. It is the fourth installment in the Legend of Zelda series and the first for a handheld game console. Link's Awakening is one of the few Zelda games not to take place in the land of Hyrule, and it does not feature Princess Zelda or the Triforce relic. Instead, the protagonist Link begins the game stranded on Koholint Island, a place guarded by a whale-like deity called the Wind Fish. Assuming the role of Link, the player fights monsters and solves puzzles while searching for eight musical instruments that will awaken the sleeping Wind Fish and allow him to escape from the island. It is also the only Zelda game with Yoshi.

Development began as an effort to port the Super Nintendo Entertainment System game The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past to the Game Boy, developed after-hours by Nintendo staff. It grew into an original project under the direction of Takashi Tezuka, with a story and script created by Yoshiaki Koizumi and Kensuke Tanabe. The majority of the Link to the Past team reassembled for Link's Awakening, and Tezuka wanted the game world to feel like the television series Twin Peaks. After a development period of one and a half years, Link's Awakening was released in Japan in June 1993 and worldwide later in the year.

Link's Awakening was critically and commercially successful. Critics praised the game's depth and number of features; complaints focused on its control scheme and monochrome graphics. An updated rerelease, The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX,[b] was released for the Game Boy Color in 1998 featuring color graphics, compatibility with the Game Boy Printer, and an exclusive color-based dungeon. Together, the two versions of the game have sold more than six million units worldwide, and have appeared on multiple game publications' lists of the best video games of all time. A high-definition remake for the Nintendo Switch was developed by Grezzo and released worldwide in 2019.

Gameplay[edit]

In a castle, a boy in a green suit unsheats his sword against a knight in armor.
The protagonist, Link, battles an enemy in a castle. The bottom portion of the screen displays rupees, equipped items, and the character's health(represented by hearts).[9]The right half of the image depicts the graphics of the original game, while the left shows the color graphics of the DXedition.

Like most games in The Legend of Zelda series, Link's Awakening is an action-adventure game focused on exploration and combat.[10] The majority of the game takes place from an overhead perspective.[11] The player traverses the overworld of Koholint Island while fighting monsters and exploring underground dungeons. Dungeons steadily become larger and more difficult, and feature "Nightmare" boss characters that the player must defeat, taking different forms in each dungeon, and getting harder to defeat each time.[9] Success earns the player heart containers, which increase the amount of damage the player character can survive; when all of the player's heart containers have been emptied, the game restarts at the last doorway entered by the character. Defeating a Nightmare also earns the player one of the eight instruments necessary to complete the game.[9]

Link's Awakening was the first overhead-perspective Zelda game to allow Link to jump; this enables sidescrolling sequences similar to those in the earlier Zelda II: The Adventure of Link.[11] Players can expand their abilities with items, which are discovered in dungeons and through character interactions. Certain items grant access to previously inaccessible areas and are needed to enter and complete dungeons. The player may steal items from the game's shop, but doing so changes the player character's name to "THIEF" for the rest of the game and causes the shopkeeper to knock out the character upon re-entry of the shop.[11]

In addition to the main quest, Link's Awakening contains side-missions and diversions. Collectible "secret seashells" are hidden throughout the game; when twenty of these are found, the player can receive a powerful sword that fires energy beams when the player character is at full health, similar to the sword in the original The Legend of Zelda. Link's Awakening is the first Zelda game to include a trading sequence minigame: the player may give a certain item to a character, who in turn gives the player another item to trade with someone else.[9] It is also the first game in the Zelda series in which the A and B buttons may be assigned to different items, which enables more varied puzzles and item combinations.[11] Other series elements originating in Link's Awakening include fishing, and learning special songs on an ocarina; the latter mechanic is central to the next Zelda game released, Ocarina of Time.[12]

Synopsis[edit]

Setting and characters[edit]

Further information: Fictional chronology of The Legend of Zelda

Unlike most The Legend of Zelda titles, Link's Awakening is set outside the kingdom of Hyrule. It omits locations and characters from previous games, aside from protagonist Link and a passing mention of Princess Zelda.[11][13] Instead, the game takes place entirely on Koholint Island,[11] an isolated landmass cut off from the rest of the world. The island, though small, contains a large number of secrets and interconnected pathways.[14] Within the Zelda timeline, Link's Awakening takes place after Ocarina of Time and A Link to the Past, but before Oracle of Seasons and Ages.[15][16]

In Link's Awakening, the player is given advice and directions by non-player characters such as Ulrira, a shy old man who communicates with Link exclusively by telephone. The game contains cameo appearances by characters from other Nintendo titles, such as Wart, Yoshi, Kirby, Dr. Wright (renamed Mr. Write) from the Super NES version of SimCity, and the exiled prince Richard from The Frog for Whom the Bell Tolls.[17][18][19]Chomp, an enemy from the Mario series, was included after a programmer gave Link the ability to grab the creature and take it for a walk. Enemies from Super Mario Bros. such as Goombas and Piranha Plants also appear in underground side-scrolling sections; Link may land on top of them much as with Super Mario Bros., or he can attack them in the usual way: the two methods yield different bonuses. Director Takashi Tezuka said that the game's "freewheeling" development made Link's Awakening seem like a parody of The Legend of Zelda series.[18] Certain characters in the game break the fourth wall; for example, little children inform the player of game mechanics such as saving, but admit that they do not understand the advice they are giving.[20]

Plot[edit]

After the events of A Link to the Past, the hero Link travels by ship to other countries to train for further threats. A storm destroys his boat at sea, and he washes ashore on Koholint Island,[21] where he is taken to the house of Tarin by his daughter Marin. She is fascinated by Link and the outside world, and tells Link wishfully that, if she were a seagull, she would leave and travel across the sea.[22] After Link recovers his sword, a mysterious owl tells him that he must wake the Wind Fish, Koholint's guardian, in order to return home. The Wind Fish lies dreaming in a giant egg on top of Mt. Tamaranch, and can only be awakened by the eight Instruments of the Sirens.

Link proceeds to explore a series of dungeons in order to recover the eight instruments. During his search for the sixth instrument, Link goes to the Ancient Ruins. There he finds a mural that details the reality of the island: that it is merely a dream world created by the Wind Fish.[23] After this revelation, the owl tells Link that this is only a rumor, and only the Wind Fish knows for certain whether it is true. Throughout Koholint Island, nightmare creatures attempt to obstruct Link's quest for the instruments, as they wish to rule the Wind Fish's dreamworld.

After collecting all eight instruments from the eight dungeons across Koholint, Link climbs to the top of Mt. Tamaranch and plays the Ballad of the Wind Fish.[9] This breaks open the egg in which the Wind Fish sleeps; Link enters and confronts the last evil being, a Nightmare that takes the form of Ganon and other enemies from Link's past.[24] Its final transformation is "DethI", a cyclopean, dual-tentacled Shadow.[25][26] After Link defeats DethI, the owl reveals itself to be the Wind Fish's spirit, and the Wind Fish confirms that Koholint is all his dream. When Link plays the Ballad of the Wind Fish again, he and the Wind Fish awaken; Koholint Island and all its inhabitants slowly disappear.[27] Link finds himself lying on his ship's driftwood in the middle of the ocean, with the Wind Fish flying overhead. If the player did not lose any lives during the game, Marin is shown flying after the ending credits finish.[28][c]

Development[edit]

Link's Awakening began as an unsanctioned side project; programmer Kazuaki Morita created a Zelda-like game with one of the first Game Boydevelopment kits, and he used it to experiment with the platform's capabilities. Other staff members of the Nintendo Entertainment Analysis & Development division joined him after-hours and worked on the game in what seemed to them like an "afterschool club". The results of these experiments with the Game Boy started to look promising. Following the 1991 release of the Super NES video game The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, director Takashi Tezuka asked for permission to develop a handheld Zelda title; he intended it to be a port of A Link to the Past, but it evolved into an original game.[3] The majority of the team that had created A Link to the Past was reassembled to advance this new project. Altogether, it took them one and a half years to develop Link's Awakening.[30]

A long-haired man wearing a coat and a striped shirt.
Designer Yoshiaki Koizumi was in charge of the game's story and conceived major plot points, such as the dream world island setting.

Tezuka recalled that the early free-form development of Link's Awakening resulted in the game's "unrestrained" contents, such as the unauthorized cameo appearances of characters from the Mario and Kirby series.[18]A Link to the Past script writer Kensuke Tanabe joined the team early on and came up with the basis of the story.[18][31] Tezuka sought to make Link's Awakening a spin-off, and he gave Tanabe instructions to omit common series elements such as Princess Zelda, the Triforce relic, and the setting Hyrule.[31] As a consequence, Tanabe proposed his game world idea of an island with an egg on top of a mountain.[31] Tezuka recalled that it felt as though they were making a "parody of The Legend of Zelda" rather than an actual Zelda game.[32]

Later on, Yoshiaki Koizumi, who had previously helped with the plot of A Link to the Past, was brought into the team.[18][30] Koizumi was responsible for the main story of Link's Awakening, provided the idea of the island in a dream, and conceived the interactions with the villagers.[31][33][34]Link's Awakening was described by series producer Eiji Aonuma as the first Zelda game with a proper plot, which he attributed to Koizumi's romanticism.[35] Tezuka intended the game's world to have a similar feeling to the American television series Twin Peaks, which, like Link's Awakening, features characters in a small town.[18] He suggested that the characters of Link's Awakening be written as "suspicious types", akin to those in Twin Peaks—a theme which carried over into later Zelda titles.[35] Tanabe created these "odd" characters; he was placed in charge of the subevents of the story and wrote almost all of the character dialog, with the exception of the owl's and the Wind Fish's lines.[18][31] Tanabe implemented a previous idea of the world ending when a massive egg breaks on top of a mountain; this idea was originally meant for A Link to the Past. Tanabe really wanted to see this idea in a game and was able to implement it in Link's Awakening as the basic concept.[36]

Masanao Arimoto and Shigefumi Hino designed the game's characters, while Yoichi Kotabe served as illustrator.[37] Save for the opening and the ending, all pictures in the game were drawn by Arimoto.[31] Yasahisa Yamamura designed the dungeons, which included the conception of rooms and routes, as well as the placement of enemies.[31]Shigeru Miyamoto, who served as the producer of Link's Awakening, did not provide creative input to the staff members. However, he participated as game tester, and his opinions greatly influenced the latter half of the development.[30]

The music for Link's Awakening was composed by Minako Hamano, Kozue Ishikawa, for whom it was their first game project,[30] and Kazumi Totaka, who also was responsible for the sound programming and all sound effects.[30] As with most Zelda games, Link's Awakening includes a variation of the recurring overworld music; The staff credits theme, "Yume o Miru Shima e" was later arranged for orchestra by Yuka Tsujiyoko and performed at the Orchestral Game Music Concert 3 in 1993.[38]Super Smash Bros. Brawl includes a remix of the game's "Tal Tal Heights" theme,[39] which has since returned in subsequent Super Smash Bros. titles.

In an interview about the evolution of the Zelda series, Aonuma called Link's Awakening the "quintessential isometricZelda game".[40] At another time, he stated that, had the game not come after A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time would have been very different.[35] Tezuka stated that he prefers the game over A Link to the Past, as he enjoyed the challenge of making a similar game on lower-specced hardware.[41] Several elements from Link's Awakening were re-used in later Zelda titles; for example, programmer Morita created a fishing minigame that reappeared in Ocarina of Time, among others. Tanabe implemented a trading sequence; Tezuka compared it to the Japanese Straw Millionaire folktale, in which someone trades up from a piece of straw to something of greater value. This concept also appeared in most sequels.[18]

Release[edit]

The Game Boy Printeraccessory was compatible with the DXrelease of Link's Awakening.

To support the North American release of Link's Awakening, Nintendo sponsored a crosscountry train competition called the Zelda Whistle Stop Tour.[42] The event, which lasted three days, allowed select players to test Link's Awakening in a timed race to complete the game.[43] The event was meant not only to showcase the game, but also the Game Boy's superior battery life and portability, the latter of which was critical to the accessibility of a portable Zelda title.[11][42] The company-owned magazine Nintendo Power published a guide to the game's first three areas in its July 1993 issue.[17]

In 1998, to promote the launch of the Game Boy Color, Nintendo re-released Link's Awakening as The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX. It features fully colorized graphics and is backward compatible with the original Game Boy. Link's Awakening DX contains a new optional dungeon, with unique enemies and puzzles based on color (due to this, the dungeon cannot be accessed on the earlier non-color Game Boy models).[14] After completing the dungeon, the player may choose to receive either a red or blue tunic, which increase attack and defense, respectively. The DX version also allows players to take photos after the player visits a camera shop, its owner will appear in certain locations throughout the game. A total of twelve photos can be taken, which may be viewed at the shop, or printed with the Game Boy Printer accessory.[14][44] For Link's Awakening DX, Tezuka returned as project supervisor, with Yoshinori Tsuchiyama as the new director.[31] Nobuo Matsumiya collaborated with Tsuchiyama on applying changes to the original script; for example, hint messages were added to the boss battles.[31] For the new dungeon, Yuichi Ozaki created a musical piece based on Kondo's dungeon theme from the original The Legend of Zelda.[31][45]

In 2010, Nintendo announced that the DX version would be re-released on the Virtual Console of the Nintendo 3DS,[46] and became available June 2011. In July 2013, Link's Awakening DX was offered as one of several Virtual Console games which "elite status" members of the North America Club Nintendo could redeem as a free gift.[47] A high-definition remake was developed by Grezzo and released for the Nintendo Switch on September 20, 2019.[48]

In Nintendo's E3 2021 Direct, it was announced that game will be included in a Zelda-themed Game & Watch console alongside The Legend of Zelda and Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. It is set for release on November 12, 2021.[49]

Reception[edit]

Reception

Link's Awakening was critically acclaimed, and holds an average score of 90% on aggregate site GameRankings.[50] In a retrospective article, Electronic Gaming Monthly writer Jeremy Parish called Link's Awakening the "best Game Boy game ever, an adventure so engrossing and epic that we can even forgive the whole thing for being one of those 'It's all a dream!' fakeouts".[61]Game Informer's Ben Reeves called it the third best Game Boy game and called it influential.[62]The Washington Post's Chip Carter declared that Nintendo had created a "legend that fits in the palm of your hand", and praised its portability and depth.[63] An Jōkiri of ITMedia echoed similar comments.[64] A writer for the Mainichi Shimbun enjoyed the game's music and story.[65] Multiple sources touted it as an excellent portable adventure for those without the time for more sophisticated games.[66][67]

Complaints about the game included its control scheme and monochrome graphics; certain critics believed that they made it difficult to discern the screen's contents,[68] and wished that the game was in color. Critic William Burrill dismissed the game's visuals as "Dim Boy graphics [that are] nothing to write home about".[69] Both Carter and the Ottawa Citizen's Bill Provick found the two-button control scheme awkward, as they needed to switch items on almost every screen.[63][68]The Vancouver Sun's Katherine Monk called the dialogue "stilted", but considered the rest of the game to be "ever-surprising".[70]

Link's Awakening DX also received positive reviews with multiple critics highlighting the color graphics as an improvement; based on ten media outlets, it holds an average score of 91% on Game Rankings.[51]IGN's Adam Cleveland awarded the game a perfect score, and noted that "throughout the color-enhanced version of Zelda DX, it can easily be inferred that Nintendo has reworked its magic to fit new standards", by adding new content while keeping the original game intact.[10] Cameron Davis of GameSpot applauded the game's camera support and attention to detail in coloration and style,[53] while reviewers for the Courier Mail believed that the camera added gameplay depth and allowed players to show off trophies.[71]The Daily Telegraph's Samantha Amjadali wrote that the addition of color made the game easier by reducing deaths caused by indistinct graphics.[72]Total Games noted that the new content added little to the game, but found it addictive to play nonetheless.[73]

The game won several awards, including those in the Game Boy categories for Graphics and Sound, Challenge, Theme and Fun, Play Control, and Best Overall in the reader-chosen 1993 Nintendo Power Awards.[56] It was awarded Best Game Boy Game of 1993 by Electronic Gaming Monthly.[60] In 1997 Electronic Gaming Monthly ranked the Game Boy version the 28th best console video game of all time, saying it ended up "beating out the Super NES Zelda in both size and scope." They also lauded its humorous dialogue, hefty challenge, and incorporation of the best gameplay mechanics of its predecessors.[74]Nintendo Power later named it the fifty-sixth best Nintendo game,[57] and, in August 2008, listed the DX version as the second best Game Boy or Game Boy Color game.[75] IGN's readers ranked it as the 40th best game of all time, while the staff placed it at 78th;[58][59] the staff believed that, "while handheld spin-offs are generally considered the low point for game franchises, Link's Awakening proves that they can offer just as rich a gameplay experience as their console counterparts".[59]

Sales[edit]

In Japan, the game topped the Famitsu sales chart in June 1993.[76] In North America, it was the top-selling Game Boy game in August 1993.[77]Link's Awakening sold well and helped boost Game Boy sales 13 percent in 1993—making it one of Nintendo's most profitable years in North America up to that time.[78] The game remained on bestseller lists for more than 90 months after release,[79] and went on to sell 3.83 million units by 2004. The DX version sold another 2.22 million units.[80] The Virtual Console release of Link's Awakening DX was the top-selling downloadable Nintendo 3DS game of 2011, selling over 338,700 units, or an estimated $2.3 million in gross revenue.[81]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^"Game Boy (original) Games"(PDF). Nintendo of America Inc. Archived from the original(PDF) on December 14, 2010. Retrieved January 17, 2011.
  2. ^ (in Japanese). Nintendo Co., Ltd. Archived from the original on December 16, 2008. Retrieved March 26, 2009.
  3. ^ ab"Iwata Asks: Zelda Handheld History – Like an Afterschool Club". Nintendo of Europe GmbH. Archived from the original on June 29, 2012. Retrieved January 17, 2011.
  4. ^The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (1993) Game Boy release dates - MobyGamesArchived April 26, 2015, at the Wayback Machine: "Country: United Kingdom - Release Date: Nov 18, 1993"
  5. ^Mega Fun 11/1993 (German magazine; Scan @ Kultboy.comArchived May 1, 2015, at the Wayback Machine): "Erscheinungstermin: November" (Release date: November)
  6. ^"The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX". Nintendo of Europe GmbH. Archived from the original on June 29, 2012. Retrieved May 17, 2009.
  7. ^"Zeldaの伝説 – Introduction" (in Japanese). Nintendo Co., Ltd. Archived from the original on January 16, 2008. Retrieved January 17, 2011.
  8. ^"Guide 64: Game Boy Release Schedule". Archived from the original on October 9, 1999.
  9. ^ abcdeThe Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Instruction Booklet. Nintendo of America Inc. August 1993. pp. 9–28.
  10. ^ abcCleveland, Adam (September 17, 1999). "Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX – Game Boy Color Review". IGN. IGN Entertainment, Inc. Archived from the original on November 9, 2012. Retrieved December 4, 2007.
  11. ^ abcdefg"Zelda Retrospective Part 2". GameTrailers. MTV Networks. October 20, 2006. Archived from the original on October 13, 2012. Retrieved March 10, 2011.
  12. ^Vestal, Andrew; O'Neill, Cliff; Shoemaker, Brad. "History of Zelda". GameSpot. CBS Interactive Inc. p. 13. Archived from the original on October 16, 2003. Retrieved December 4, 2007.
  13. ^Nintendo Co., Ltd (December 1, 1998). The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX. Nintendo of America Inc.
  14. ^ abcVestal, Andrew; O'Neill, Cliff; Shoemaker, Brad. "History of Zelda". GameSpot. CBS Interactive Inc. p. 11. Archived from the original on December 21, 2005. Retrieved December 4, 2007.
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Notes[edit]

  1. ^Known in Japan as Zelda no Densetsu: Yume o Miru Shima (ゼルダの伝説 夢をみる島, Zeruda no Densetsu: Yume o Miru Shima, lit. "The Legend of Zelda: The Dreaming Island").
  2. ^Known in Japan as Zelda no Densetsu: Yume o Miru Shima DX (ゼルダの伝説 夢をみる島DX, Zeruda no Densetsu: Yume o Miru Shima Derakkusu, lit. "The Legend of Zelda: The Dreaming Island Deluxe").
  3. ^In the DX and Switch versions, Marin is instead implied to have become a seagull flying across the ocean.[29]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Link%27s_Awakening
The Story of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Gaming Historian
This article is about the original game for the Game Boy. For other uses, see Link's Awakening (Disambiguation).

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is the fourth main installment of The Legend of Zelda series & the first title in the series to be released on Handheld, it is also the only Zelda title on the original Game Boy. A color update, titled Link's Awakening DX, is one of the three Zelda titles for the Game Boy Color. Since its release, Link's Awakening has been popular among fans and critics. By 2004, the original release had sold 3.83 million copies worldwide, while Link's Awakening DX sold 2.22 million.[3] In 2009, Guinness World Records named it the 42nd most influential video game of all time.[4]

During a Nintendo Direct on February 13, 2019, an eponymous remake of the game was announced for Nintendo Switch. The remake was released on September 20, 2019.

Story

Link, who had defeated the evil Ganon and regained peace in Hyrule, had not enjoyed the tranquility he had worked so hard to achieve for long, and eventually became restless. Feeling in need of training or enlightenment, he embarked on a journey and sailed across the oceans in a small sailboat.[5] Eventually, Link completed his training in foreign countries and began to sail back to his home, Hyrule. But suddenly the seas turned rough and the skies became dark. Link tried valiantly to fight the strong currents of the waves, even tying himself to the ship with some rope. But a bolt of lightning struck the ship and everything went dark.

Later on a faraway Island, a young girl named Marin is walking along the Shores of the Island's beach. She suddenly spots someone laying on the sands. Upon looking closer, she finds an unconscious Link and tries to wake him, but to no avail. Unwilling to simply leave him lying on the beach, Marin takes Link back to her house in Mabe Village. From beyond the darkness, Link hears the voice of a girl. He first mistakes the voice to be that of Princess Zelda, but wakes up to discover that it was instead the voice of Marin.[6][7] It turned out that, miraculously, Link had been washed ashore on Koholint Island.[6][7][8]Link starts his preparations to leave Koholint Island, and Tarin gives him back his Shield. He also tells him of another thing that washed up on the beach.

Yet Link's Sword is nowhere to be found. Searching on Koholint Island's beach, Link eventually finds it. Just before picking it up, a mysterious Owl flies down to him. The Owl explains that high on the mountaintops of Koholint Island is a giant Egg, and inside sleeps a being known as the Wind Fish. The Owl says that the Wind Fish must be awakened, for that is the only way Link can leave Koholint Island.[9] He tells Link that he needs to go into the Mysterious Woods to find a Key and then flies away. Left with nothing but a puzzling riddle and his questions, Link heeds the Owl's words and heads into the Mysterious Woods. He eventually finds the Tail Key. The Owl reappears and tells him to go into Tail Cave and to use the Tail Key to get inside.

Link does so and fights his way through this early Dungeon. After defeating the Boss, Link finds a magical Instrument, the Full Moon Cello. Although Link does not know what it is at first, the Owl reappears and explains that this instrument is one of the Instruments of the Sirens. The Owl explains that Link must retrieve the remaining seven Instruments of the Sirens if he is to awaken the sleeping Wind Fish. Link, still full of questions about this strange world, must explore the rest of Koholint Island and find the remainder of the Instruments of the Sirens.

Later in his journey, Link arrives in Animal Village. The Owl had told him to venture into Yarna Desert to find an important item that will aid him. Unfortunately, a large, sleeping Walrus blocks his path. However, one of the six rabbit siblings of Animal Village tells Link that Marin and her beautiful voice can awaken those who hear her. Link returns to Mabe Village and eventually gets an Ocarina from the Dream Shrine. He finds Marin on the Toronbo Shores who tells him of her wish to be a Seagull so that she can fly around the world and share her songs with many people. She hopes that she can make this wish to the Wind Fish. Afterwards, Link learns from Marin how to play the Ballad of the Wind Fish on his Ocarina, a song of awakening. However, since it is not enough to awaken the Walrus, Marin tags along with Link to Animal Village. Marin decides to stay in Animal Village after the Walrus awakes, and Link finds the Angler Key in Yarna Desert.

Sometime before getting the sixth Instrument of the Sirens, the Owl flies to Link and tells him to go to the Southern Face Shrine. When Link arrives there, he learns the horrible truth about Koholint Island. On a wall depicting the Wind Fish himself, the words read "TO THE FINDER... THE ISLE OF KOHOLINT, IS BUT AN ILLUSION... HUMAN, MONSTER, SEA, SKY... A SCENE ON THE LID OF A SLEEPER'S EYE... AWAKE THE DREAMER, AND KOHOLINT WILL VANISH MUCH LIKE A BUBBLE ON A NEEDLE... CAST-AWAY, YOU SHOULD KNOW THE TRUTH!"

Link now faces a dilemma, whether he should awaken the Wind Fish or not. But the Owl tells him that none know if the inscription is true, and advises him to trust his feelings.[10]Link continues on, finding the remaining three Instruments of the Sirens. Eventually, he discovers Marin on Tal Tal Mountain Range being attacked by monsters. Link saves her, and for a moment, she tries to tell Link something... but changes her mind. The Owl knows about the song that she always sings, the Ballad of the Wind Fish, and wonders if she was trying to awaken the Wind Fish.[11]

After Link obtains all eight of the Instruments of the Sirens, the Owl says that now is the time to awaken the Wind Fish. Link heads up the mountaintop and encounters the Wind Fish's Egg, in which the Wind Fish sleeps. With his Ocarina in hand and the other Instruments of the Sirens, Link plays the Ballad of the Wind Fish. The Wind Fish's Egg cracks open, and Link ventures inside.

Inside, Link finds the true mastermind behind all of the chaos on Koholint Island, the Shadow Nightmares who have the power to transform. The monsters were created by the Shadow Nightmares to prevent Link from awakening the Wind Fish.[12] After a long battle, Link defeats the Shadow Nightmares, the last of Koholint Island's evils. Suddenly, a stairway opens and Link climbs up, where he finds himself in a strange black room filled with rainbow clouds and stars.

There the Owl comes to see Link one last time. The Owl explains that he is in fact part of the Wind Fish's spirit, and thus was the guardian of his dream world.[13] All was peaceful in the Wind Fish's dream, until Nightmares began to invade it. Many of the Nightmares that Link had faced were the ones in the Dungeons that had guarded the Instruments of the Sirens. But now Link had defeated the last one, and the Wind Fish's dream was at peace once again. With the Nightmares gone and the eight Instruments of the Sirens retrieved, the Wind Fish could finally be awakened. The Owl then states that his role in this dream is now complete and says farewell to Link before vanishing.[14]

Suddenly, Link hears a wail and the Wind Fish appears before him. The Wind Fish says that in his dreams, a whole world had existed.[15] Yet he could not awaken due to the Nightmares. It is only natural that dreams are to end, and when he awakes, Koholint Island shall disappear.[15] He says that Link may someday recall this dream in the waking world, the only remaining memory of Koholint Island.

The Wind Fish then fades away and says that they should awaken together, and commands Link to play the Ballad of the Wind Fish one more time. Link does so slowly, while Koholint Island and its inhabitants fade away. Link is then forced out of the Wind Fish's room by a stream of water.

The sky above shines brightly as Seagulls fly overhead. Link awakens on a wooden board in the sea, part of his ship. Just as it was predicted, Koholint Island is gone and Link is back in the real world. As he recalls all of the events of his latest adventure, a shadow looms over him. Looking up, he sees the Wind Fish flying above him in the sky. Link smiles, realizing that he actually helped awaken the Wind Fish. Link's dream journey had finally come to an end.

The Legend of the Wind Fish

It appears that the Wind Fish is a mere myth to the inhabitants of Koholint Island. The Wind Fish's Egg on top of Mt. Tamaranch is rather large and can be seen from a distance, making it obvious that some of the inhabitants of Koholint Island would know at least something of the Wind Fish, however. Marin is a very good example of a simple citizen of Mabe Village, yet she knows of the existence of the Wind Fish. She even dreams of wishing on the Wind Fish to turn into a Seagull. It's not quite obvious if she too believes it is just a myth or if it is real, however, Marin can be spotted on Tal Tal Mountain Range for no apparent reason. The Owl seems to believe that she may have tried to awaken the Wind Fish with her song.[11] Only the Owl and possibly Marin seem to know of the actual existence of the Wind Fish. Shortly after Link clears the Face Shrine, a boy in Mabe Village was asked by Link when they had appeared on the Koholint Island but had no idea what Link meant by this,[16] suggesting that the inhabitants of Koholint Island have no idea that they are part of a dream world.

The Southern Face Shrine is the only place that holds much information about the myth of the Wind Fish, and the script upon its walls, about Koholint Island being but a dream,[17] is very much true. Judging by these writings, the Southern Face Shrine seems to have been built solely for the person who would awaken the Wind Fish.

The Perfect Ending

If Link completes his quest without dying, an additional scene can be seen after the ending credits. Both versions of the game show Marin as a Seagull (or simply having Seagull wings) while the "Ballad of the Wind Fish" theme plays in the background. This may either hint that Marin had her wish come true and was "saved" from the fading dream world, or simply that Link was thinking of Marin and her wish of becoming a Seagull.

The perfect ending varies between the original Game Boy release and the Game Boy Color release. In the original, a Marin with wings on her back will fly around the words "The End" while singing her song. In Link's Awakening DX, a full-colored image of Marin can be seen within the clouds, and her song will be playing in the background, although she is not the one singing. Shortly afterward, the image fades into a Seagull who flies away. In the Nintendo Switch version, it is largely similar to Link's Awakening DX, although Marin's image is animated slightly to have her briefly close her eyes and shudder in an apparent giggle before it fades away with a seagull flying past.

Timeline Placement

According to Hyrule Historia, Link's Awakening is the sequel to A Link to the Past, Oracle of Seasons, and Oracle of Ages. It takes place in the "Downfall" split timeline after Ocarina of Time, where Ganon defeated the Hero of Time. The prologue speaks of Link defeating Ganon and saving Hyrule, an apparent reference to A Link to the Past. Link journeys away from Hyrule to embark on a "quest for enlightenment".[18] The "quest for enlightenment" away from Hyrule is the story told in Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages. After defeating Ganon once more at the end of the Linked Game, Link leaves Labrynna on a boat. This leads to the events of Link's Awakening.[19]Link's Awakening is followed by A Link Between Worlds centuries later.

According to EncyclopediaLink's Awakening takes place between A Link to the Past, Oracle of Ages and Oracle of Seasons.

During an interview around the release of Ocarina of Time, Shigeru Miyamoto stated that Link's Awakening could have occurred at any point following Ocarina of Time.[20]

Zelda.com originally stated that Link's Awakening occurred partway through The Adventure of Link, taking place during the period where Link crosses the sea to Eastern Hyrule.[21]

Completion Records

Main article: Speedrun Records

Listings

Characters

Bosses and Mini-bosses

Enemies

Places

Dungeons

Items and Equipment

Translations

Credits

Glitches

Ports and Remakes

Link's Awakening DX

Main article: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX for Game Boy Color is an enhanced port of Link's Awakening with several new additions, most notably the entire game is now in color.[14] It was released just after the release of Ocarina of Time.

Link's Awakening DX can be played on a Game Boy as well, although playing it on a Game Boy makes accessing the optional Color Dungeon impossible. However, if the dungeon is started on a Game Boy Color and then played on the original Game Boy, the dungeon is accessible.

Nintendo 3DS re-release

It was announced at Nintendo's E3 Press Conference on June 7, 2011 by Shigeru Miyamoto that Link's Awakening DX would release that day alongside Super Mario Land as the first Virtual Console games on the Nintendo eShop.[27] The eShop price for the game is $5.99 in the United States, $9AU in Australia, and £5.40 in the United Kingdom.

Nintendo Switch remake

Main article: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (Nintendo Switch)

A trailer announcing and showing off early footage of a 3D remake of Link's Awakening for the Nintendo Switch was included as the final segment of the February 13, 2019 edition of Nintendo Direct, with a scheduled release on Sep 20, 2019.[28] Some differences include anime-styled cutscenes in the beginning and ending, voice acting by some characters, and a Dungeon maker mode.

Game & Watch: The Legend of Zelda

A port of the original Game Boy version of Link's Awakening is one of the games to be included in Game & Watch: The Legend of Zelda, announced at E3 2021.[29]

Legacy

While not as influential to the overall structure of Zelda games as The Legend of Zelda or A Link to the Past, Link's Awakening introduced a number of elements that recur in later Zelda games, including:

  • The use of a location other than Hyrule as a setting.
  • A list of songs playable on the game's instrument that must be learned and have different functions, although unlike in Ocarina of Time and some later games the songs simply play when selected, rather than having to be played note by note.
  • The first occurrence of fishing.
  • Unique background music for each dungeon rather than reusing the same single theme or few themes, as its predecessors did. Most games after Link's Awakening follow its lead in this respect.
  • The first trading sequence in the series.
  • The first clear example of a lava or fire-themed dungeon in the series, with Turtle Rock.
  • The Roc's Feather.
  • An Owl who periodically meets Link and gives him advice on where to go or what to do next.
  • A set of well-hidden collectible items that have no use by themselves but can be redeemed at a certain location to receive useful items. (Secret Seashells in Link's Awakening, with Gold Skulltulas and Poe Souls as examples of successors.)
  • The boss theme for this game was later used for the miniboss theme in Oracle of Seasons/Oracle of Ages, as well as a remix being used in the fight against Twinrova in the linked ending.
  • Some of the DLC outfits for the various characters in Hyrule Warriors were based on those of Link's Awakening, and one of the maps for Legend Mode is derived in appearance and plotline from the same game as well. Also, Marin is a DLC warrior in the game, with some of her attacks involving the Wind Fish.

References to other Nintendo games

File:LADX Christine's Fake Photo Sprite.png

"Christine" (actually Princess Peach)

There are many references to Nintendo games in Link's Awakening. The majority are from the Mario series.

  • The Yoshi Doll
  • Tarin himself, who is similar in appearance to Mario.
  • Tarin turning into a raccoon after eating a Mushroom might be a reference to Super Mario Bros. 3 (although Mario turned into a raccoon using a leaf).
  • The Cucco Keeper is similar in appearance to Luigi.
  • The Wind Fish's Egg is similar in appearance to a Yoshi Egg.
  • Mr. Write shows Link a picture of Princess Peach sent to him by the goat in Animal Village. (Because of the picture, her name is implied to be Christine. This scene is poking fun at long distance relationships involving mail, e-mail, etc. since the goat is lying about who she really is and Mr. Write thinks he is writing to a beautiful woman.)
    • In the Switch version, the name is omitted, and the photo itself is replaced with promotional artwork of Princess Peach carrying a parasol.
  • Mr. Write is similar in appearance to Dr. Wright from the Super Nintendo version of SimCity. They share the same last name, but both are spelled differently.
  • In addition to Mario characters, Richard from The Frog For Whom the Bell Tolls made an appearance.
  • Mamu is based on Wart, the final boss of Super Mario Bros. 2.
  • Various enemies are based on a number of characters from Nintendo games, particularly Mario adventures:

Trivia

  • The game's setting was partially inspired by the American mystery television series, Twin Peaks.[30]
  • Princess Zelda is not featured at all in Link's Awakening, though she is referenced by Link, initially confusing Marin for her.
  • If the name "ZELDA" is used when creating a new game, a remixed Zelda theme will play in the background.
    • In the Japanese version, entering the name "ぜるだ" yields the same result. In addition, enting the name "とたけけ" will play an arranged version of Totaka's Song.
    • In the original German release, entering the name "MOYSE" will play a strange jingle. In the German DX release, "MOYSE" will instead play Totaka's Song.
    • The French DX version will yield the same result as "ZELDA" if the entered name is "LOLO". In the original release, "LOLO" will instead play a different song than "MOYSE" or "とたけけ".
  • With the exception of Eagle's Tower, every dungeon in Link's Awakening has a map that forms a picture of an object, such as a Moldorm in the case of Tail Cave or a Key in the case of Key Cavern.
  • Link's Awakening originally was intended to be a handheld port of A Link to the Past.[citation needed]

Nomenclature

Gallery

External Links

References

  1. 1.01.1Encyclopedia (Dark Horse Books) pg. 7
  2. Encyclopedia (Dark Horse Books) pg. 10
  3. "The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening 3.83, The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX 2.22" — Xenogears vs. Tetris, RPGGamer.
  4. "42. Link’s Awakening" — Guinness lists top 50 games of all time News, Euro Gamer.
  5. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening — Nintendo Player's Guide (Nintendo Co., Ltd.) pg. 8
  6. 6.06.1"What a relief!" — Marin (Link's Awakening for Nintendo Switch)
  7. 7.07.1"I thought you'd never wake up! You were tossing and turning... What? Zelda? No, my name's Marin! You must still be feeling a little woozy. You are on Koholint Island!" — Marin (Link's Awakening for Nintendo Switch)
  8. ↑"Follow the lane south to reach the beach where I found you. Since you washed ashore, lots of nasty monsters have been in the area, so be careful, okay?" — Marin (Link's Awakening DX)
  9. ↑"Hoot!Hoot! So you are the lad who owns the sword... Now I understand why the monsters are starting to act so violently... A courageous lad has come to wake the Wind Fish... It is said that you cannot leave the island unless you wake the Wind Fish... You should now go north, to the Mysterious Forest. I will wait for you there! Hoot!" — Owl (Link's Awakening DX)
  10. ↑"Hoot! I see you have read the relief... While it does say the island is but a dream of the Wind Fish, no one is really sure... Just as you cannot know if a chest holds treasure until you open it, so you cannot tell if this is a dream until you awaken... The only one who knows for sure is the Wind Fish... Trust your feelings... Someday you will know for sure..." — Owl (Link's Awakening DX)
  11. 11.011.1"Hoot! That girl sang her song in front of the Egg! Her 'Ballad of the Wind Fish' is a song of awakening! Did she actually intend to wake the Wind Fish?! The next Sirens' Instrument is in the west. Play your melodies so the unliving stones might hear! Show your courage! The Wind Fish waits for you! Hoot!" — Owl (Link's Awakening DX)
  12. Encyclopedia (Dark Horse Books) pg. 38
  13. ↑"Hoot! Young lad, I mean... Link , the hero! You have defeated the Nightmares! You have proven your wisdom, courage and power! ... ... ... ... As part of the Wind Fish's spirit, I am the guardian of his dream world... But one day, the Nightmares entered the dream and began wreaking havoc. Then you, Link , came to rescue the island... I have always trusted in your courage to turn back the Nightmares. Thank you, Link ... My work is done... The Wind Fish will wake soon. Good bye...Hoot!" — Owl (Link's Awakening DX)
  14. 14.014.1The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass — Prima Official Game Guide (Prima Games) pg. 4
  15. 15.015.1"... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... I AM THE WIND FISH... LONG HAS BEEN MY SLUMBER... IN MY DREAMS... AN EGG APPEARED AND WAS SURROUNDED BY AN ISLAND, WITH PEOPLE, ANIMALS, AN ENTIRE WORLD! ... ... ... ... BUT, VERILY, IT BE THE NATURE OF DREAMS TO END! WHEN I DOST AWAKEN, KOHOLINT WILL BE GONE... ONLY THE MEMORY OF THIS DREAM LAND WILL EXIST IN THE WAKING WORLD... SOMEDAY, THOU MAY RECALL THIS ISLAND... THAT MEMORY MUST BE THE REAL DREAM WORLD... ... ... ... ... COME, Link ... LET US AWAKEN... TOGETHER!!" — Wind Fish (Link's Awakening DX)
  16. ↑"Dude! You're asking me when we started to live on this island? What do you mean by 'when?' Whoa! The concept just makes my head hurt!" — Quadruplet (Link's Awakening DX)
  17. ↑"TO THE FINDER... THE ISLE OF KOHOLINT, IS BUT AN ILLUSION... HUMAN, MONSTER, SEA, SKY... A SCENE ON THE LID OF A SLEEPER'S EYE... AWAKE THE DREAMER, AND KOHOLINT WILL VANISH MUCH LIKE A BUBBLE ON A NEEDLE... CASTAWAY, YOU SHOULD KNOW THE TRUTH! ... ... ... ... What? Illusion?" — Writing on the Wall (Link's Awakening DX)
  18. ↑"Ever vigilant, you decided to journey away from Hyrule on a quest for enlightenment..." (Link's Awakening manual, pg. 3)
  19. Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books) pg. 101
  20. "Ocarina of Time is the first story, then the original Legend of Zelda, then Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, and finally A Link to the Past. It's not very clear where Link's Awakening fits in—it could be anytime after Ocarina of Time." —Shigeru Miyamoto (Nintendo Power Vol. 116: Interview with Mr. Miyamoto)
  21. ↑http://web.archive.org/web/20021002111625/http://www.zelda.com/lib_timeline.html
  22. ↑The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Any% ACE, Speedrun.
  23. ↑https://www.speedrun.com/la/run/yw1grknz
  24. ↑The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - Any% (Warpless), Speedrun.
  25. ↑The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - 100%, Speedrun.
  26. ↑https://www.speedrun.com/la/run/zgk310vy
  27. "As part of a video montage shown at the conference, it was confirmed that Super Mario Land and The Legend Of Zelda: Link's Awakening would be two of the games coming to the 3DS Virtual Console." — 3DS Virtual Console Will Play Game Boy Games, The Official Nintendo Magazine.
  28. ↑ Nintendo, The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening - Announcement Trailer - Nintendo Switch, YouTube, published February 13, 2019, retrieved February 13, 2019.
  29. ↑ Nintendo, Game & Watch: The Legend of Zelda – Announcement Trailer, YouTube, published June 15, 2021, retrieved September 21, 2021.
  30. Encyclopedia (Dark Horse Books) pg. 235
Sours: https://zelda.fandom.com/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Link%27s_Awakening

Awakening wiki links

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Wiki Guide

Link's Awakening Switch Walkthrough

The Link's Awakening for Switch Walkthrough is complete with instructions on where to find all eight Instruments of the Sirens. Follow along with the guide for tips, tricks, boss fight strategy, and more. 

Trading Sequence - Get the Boomerang, Beat the Game

The trading sequence must be done not only to get to the final boss of The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening, but it should be done as soon as possible to get the Boomerang! It's incredibly strong.

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Collectibles

Increase Link's power with our guide to all Heart Piece Locations, as well as all Secret Seashell Locations to obtain a secret prize. You can also check out a World Map of Koholint Island, as well as the In-Game World Map.

Link's Awakening How-To Guides

Having trouble unlocking the true fast travel method in The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening or need a hand to find some of the games hidden collectibles? Check out our detailed How-To Guides below to find everything you need to know about Link's Awakening.

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Cheats and Secrets

See how you can uncover hidden Easter Eggs and secrets, as well as Nintendo Character Cameos, with our list of Cheats and Secrets for Link's Awakening.

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is the fourth entry into the heralded Legend of Zelda series and the first foray into handheld gaming. Released originally on the GameBoy, as well as the GameBoy Color, 3DS, and now Nintendo Switch, Link's Awakening does not take place in Hyrule and instead sets the protagonist Link in Koholint Island.

Trapped on the island, Link must find eight musical instruments that will awaken the slumbering Wind Fish and allow him to escape the island.

Walkthrough

Join Link on his quest to collect all eight of the mystical instruments needed to awaken the Wind Fish with our complete Walkthrough, as well as information on all side objectives and collectibles along the way. Included are strategies to defeat all of the Bosses you'll encounter.

Collectibles

Increase Link's power with our guide to all Heart Piece Locations, as well as all Secret Seashell Locations to obtain a secret prize. You can also check out a World Map of Koholint Island, as well as the In-Game World Map.

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Game Boy Cheats

See how you can uncover hidden Easter Eggs and secrets, as well as Nintendo Character Cameos, with our list of Cheats and Secrets for Link's Awakening.

Sours: https://www.ign.com/wikis/the-legend-of-zelda-links-awakening-switch/
Zelda: Link's Awakening - Final Boss + Secret Ending

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (2019 video game)

2019 action-adventure video game published by Nintendo

2019 video game

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening[a] is an action-adventure game developed by Grezzo and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo Switch. It was released worldwide on September 20, 2019. Link's Awakening is a remake of the 1993 game for the Game Boy. It retains the original's top-down perspective and gameplay, along with elements from the 1998 re-release Link's Awakening DX.

The game features a "retro-modern" art style unique within the series with toy-like character designs, diorama-like world designs, and tilt-shift visuals that evoke the original game's presentation on the Game Boy. It also features customizable dungeons which the player can create and then complete for rewards. The game received positive reviews for its faithfulness, improved gameplay, and unique art style, while its technical issues were criticized. As of March 2021, the game has sold over 5.49 million copies worldwide, making it one of the best-selling games on the Nintendo Switch.

Gameplay[edit]

See also: Gameplay of The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is an action-adventure game with a top-down perspective.[2][3] Its story is set on Koholint Island, where Link, the player character, is stranded after his ship is caught up in a storm.[4][5][6] After being rescued by a girl named Marin, Link embarks on a quest to collect the eight instruments of the Sirens and awaken Koholint's legendary Wind Fish in order to escape the island.[6] Similar to other Zelda games, the player traverses an open world with dungeons scattered throughout, featuring puzzle-solving sections and boss fights,[7] along with trading sidequests.[8] In contrast to other top-down games in the series however, Link's Awakening allows the player to jump over obstacles and onto platforms,[9] and also features side-scrollingplatforming sections.[10][11]

The "Color Dungeon" from Link's Awakening DX, which features color-based action and puzzle gameplay, is included.[12] In the Link's Awakening remake, Link's sword, shield, and upgrades are permanently equipped, allowing more items to be equipped to action buttons in comparison to the original game.[13] Various minigames also received updates, such as realistic physics in the claw crane minigame.[14] As players progress in the game, rooms from completed dungeons can be collected as pieces that the player can use to reassemble their own dungeons by visiting the non-player character Dampé at his shack.[15][16][17] The player can then complete these dungeons in a time attack mode to earn rewards such as a life-replenishing fairy bottle,[15][18] contributing to an increased replay value over the original game.[19]

Players can also unlock "plus-effects", which can be added to customized dungeons to enhance their gameplay.[20][21] The Link figurine from the Link's Awakening series of Amiibo offers a unique plus-effect, summoning Shadow Link to chase the player through the dungeon; defeating Shadow Link increases the value of rewards earned upon completing the dungeon.[21][22] Other figurines from the Zelda series of Amiibo and Zelda-themed figurines from the Super Smash Bros. series of Amiibo will unlock a random one of five special chambers in Link's Awakening, which cannot otherwise be obtained in game.[23]

Development[edit]

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is a remake of the 1993 game developed for the Game Boy.[24][25]Link's Awakening had previously been remastered for the Game Boy Color in 1998 as The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX.[2] While the original game was presented in 2D graphics in an almost square ratio on the Game Boy, the remake is presented in 3D graphics and a widescreen ratio on the Nintendo Switch.[7][24] Some sections of the game's dungeons do not fill the width of the screen though, as certain puzzles and boss fights were designed to work with the tile count of the game's original square ratio.[7]

The game adopts a "retro-modern" art style distinct from other Zelda games,[3][9] departing from the original game's A Link to the Past-inspired art style while retaining its simplicity.[26][27] The toy-like plasticine character designs also depart from the Wind Waker-inspired designs typical of many top-down Zelda games since the release of Four Swords Adventures.[2][28][29] It features a tilt-shift effect that exaggerates the camera's perspective and depth of field.[11][30] The effect was inspired by the appearance of the original game's "small [...] but very vast" world on the Game Boy's 66 millimeter screen;[31] series producer Eiji Aonuma chose a diorama-like art style to help achieve this effect.[31]

Dampé's shack, which houses the player's customized "Chamber Dungeons", replaced the Camera Shop from Link's Awakening DX, which served as a Game Boy Printer hub.[17] The Chamber dungeon came after Shigeru Miyamoto inquired with Aonuma if there was any way to implement Super Mario Maker-like gameplay into the Zelda series. Feeling that simply allowing players to create their own dungeon would be too difficult, Aonuma instead introduced Chamber Dungeons, by way of letting players rearrange dungeons as a way of achieving this goal – purposing it as a puzzle itself for players to solve.[32][33]

While the original game and DX use simple sprite-based graphics for the cutscenes due to the limitations of the Game Boy and Game Boy Color, the remake features hand-drawn animated cutscenes, directed and storyboarded by Junichi Yamamoto.[34] Oswald Katou handled the concept art, backgrounds, and color design.[35]

Release[edit]

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening was announced via a trailer showcased during a Nintendo Direct presentation in February 2019,[5][36] and was showcased with a demo at E3 2019 that June.[37] The game is published by Nintendo, and was released on September 20, 2019,[38][39]distributed digitally via the Nintendo eShop, and on physical game cards through third-party retailers.[40] A "Dreamer Edition" of Link's Awakening included the physical version of the game packaged with a Dreamer Art Book featuring concept art.[41][42] A "Limited Edition" exclusive to Europe included the physical version of the game encased in a Game Boy-themed SteelBook packaged with an expanded 120-page art book.[42][43] A limited two sided poster of the game was given out to those who pre-ordered at select retailers. A Link's Awakening-series Amiibo figurine of Link was released simultaneously with the game, replicating the character's design as he appears in Link's Awakening.[22][21][41] Aonuma described it as the first Amiibo figurine to faithfully replicate Link's in-game appearance.[44]

Reception[edit]

Reception

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening received "generally favorable" reviews, according to review aggregatorMetacritic. Most critics agreed that the main game needed little change, but that the quality of life updates were welcome. Forbes's review states that Link's Awakening is "an excellent remake of an already faultless Zelda game."[68] While USgamer stated that the remake "improves most of the flaws" from the Game Boy version while maintaining what made it a classic in the first place, they did note that "slowdown issues pop up from time to time."[64]

Sales[edit]

Link's Awakening launched at #1 on the UK, Japanese, and EMEAA physical all-format charts, becoming Grezzo's biggest debut and the fastest-selling Switch game of 2019.[69][70] It sold 141,375 physical copies in Japan and 430,000 copies in Europe during its first three days on sale.[71][72] As of December 29, 2019[update], the game sold 250,947 physical copies in Japan.[73] As of March 31, 2021[update], the game has sold 5.49 million copies worldwide.[74]

Awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Known in Japan as The Legend of Zelda: The Dreaming Island (Japanese: ゼルダの伝説 夢をみる島, Hepburn: Zeruda no Densetsu: Yume o Miru Shima)[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^"ゼルダの伝説 夢をみる島". Nintendo Co., Ltd. (in Japanese). June 11, 2019. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  2. ^ abcMcWhertor, Michael (February 13, 2019). "The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening remake coming to Nintendo Switch". Polygon. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  3. ^ abDornbush, Jonathon (February 13, 2019). "The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Remake for Nintendo Switch Announced". IGN. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  4. ^Young, Rory (February 13, 2019). "The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Remake Announced for Nintendo Switch". GameRant. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  5. ^ abDevore, Jordan (February 13, 2019). "Zelda: Link's Awakening is back with an oh-so-adorable remake for Switch". Destructoid. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  6. ^ abNintendo 2019, 08:02, "Link is shipwrecked on this island, and Marin actually rescues him, and so then he has to go and try to find a way off this seemingly inescapable island by finding the eight instruments of the Sirens and awakening the Windfish..." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  7. ^ abcAltano, Brian (February 16, 2019). "6 Questions We Have About The Zelda: Link's Awakening Switch Remake". IGN. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  8. ^Nintendo 2019, "5:42, "This Yoshi doll is actually part of a pretty vast trading quest in this game. [...] In exchange for that, I got a ribbon, and I can exchange the ribbon with someone else in this world..." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  9. ^ abIngraham, Nathan (February 14, 2019). "The 'Link's Awakening' remake could be the start of something special". Engadget. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  10. ^Kain, Erik (February 13, 2019). "'The Legend Of Zelda: Link's Awakening' Is Coming To The Nintendo Switch In 2019". Forbes. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  11. ^ abBuckley, Sean (February 13, 2019). "Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening remake announced for Nintendo Switch". CNET. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  12. ^Nintendo 2019, 12:07, "We're very, very excited to announce that the Color Dungeon is indeed in this version of the game [...] these camo-goblins sink into the ground in their various colors..." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  13. ^Nintendo 2019, 10:57, "...a huge UI improvement in this game is that your sword, shield, things like your power bracelet, pegasus boots, are always equipped, which is a huge improvement on the original because that frees up your Y and X button for whatever else you want to equip..." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  14. ^Nintendo 2019, 02:40, "...even fans who played the original game are going to notice a little bit of a difference here, because there are actual, real crane physics going on here. harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  15. ^ abMakuch, Eddie (June 11, 2019). "E3 2019 -- Zelda: Link's Awakening Remake Dungeon-Maker Mode, Release Date Revealed". Gamespot. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  16. ^Schreier, Jason (June 11, 2019). "Link's Awakening Remake Is Out September, Has A New Dungeon-Building Feature". Kotaku. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  17. ^ abNintendo 2019, "14:32, "We see this new location; this is something that DX players might recognize as being that camera hub, but in this game it's something brand new. [...] It looks a little bit like a shack, and it's filled by our friend, Dampé here!" harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  18. ^Plante, Chris (June 11, 2019). "Link's Awakening out on Sept. 20, will have a dungeon creator". Polygon. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  19. ^Serrels, Mark (June 11, 2019). "Link's Awakening shown off at E3 Nintendo Direct, reveals dungeon creator". CNET. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  20. ^Nintendo 2019, 29:20, "He's going to add, into the Chamber Dungeon, what's called a "plus-effect". The plus-effects are layered on top of the chambers, and they add a new gameplay variant to what would otherwise be a familiar room." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  21. ^ abcCarter, Chris (June 11, 2019). "(Update) Link's Awakening on Switch is getting its very own amiibo". Destructoid. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  22. ^ abBankhurst, Adam (June 11, 2019). "The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening, Dark Samus, Chrom, Incineroar, and Richter Amiibo Revealed - E3 2019". IGN. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  23. ^Nintendo 2019, 30:17, "There are other plus-effects in the game [...] In addition to the Link's Awakening Amiibo, there are other The Legend of Zelda series Amiibo that will work with Link's Awakening, but not just that; any Legend of Zelda character Amiibo will work with The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  24. ^ abGartenberg, Chaim (February 13, 2019). "The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is getting a 3D Switch remake". The Verge. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  25. ^Knezevic, Kevin (February 15, 2019). "Zelda: Link's Awakening -- Nintendo Remaking Classic Game Boy Title For Switch". Gamespot. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  26. ^Marks 2019, "...the newly announced remake of Link’s Awakening is also moving away from the original’s Link to the Past inspired style and into something we’ve (again) never really seen before. The almost plasticine look and beady eyes of its characters is totally different than both A Link Between Worlds and the Wind Waker look that many previous 2D Zeldas draw from." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFMarks2019 (help)
  27. ^Oxford, Nadia (February 14, 2019). "Why Didn't The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Switch Remake Follow in the Footsteps of A Link Between Worlds?". USgamer. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  28. ^Marks 2019, "Just after Wind Waker, the GameCube spin-off of the GBA Four Swords mode was the first 2D Zelda game to start drifting away from Link to the Past's look. harvnb error: no target: CITEREFMarks2019 (help)
  29. ^Barder, Ollie (February 14, 2019). "The 'Zelda: Link's Awakening' Remake On The Switch Has Hit Me Right In The Childhood". Forbes. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  30. ^Marks 2019, "It even appears to be using a tilt-shift blur effect in some areas..." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFMarks2019 (help)
  31. ^ abNintendo 2019, 00:58, "When I played the original Game Boy version, it was a small screen, and it felt like a small world, but very vast. And so, it kind of had this tilt shift perspective; so that's why I thought this diorama-like art style would be perfect for this." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  32. ^Dornbush, Johnathan. "Miyamoto Asked Zelda Producer to Make Mario Maker-Style Zelda Game, Which Led to Link's Awakening's New Mode". IGN. Retrieved September 30, 2019.
  33. ^Nintendo 2019, 16:20, "I've always wanted to create a way for players to create their own dungeon, but I didn't want to make it anything too hard, so just like a puzzle, or solving a puzzle, I wanted to make this Chamber Dungeon easy enough for people to play and feel like they're solving a puzzle." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
  34. ^Yamamoto, Junichi [@yamamotojunichi] (September 20, 2019). "本日発売のニンテンドースイッチ版「ゼルダの伝説 夢をみる島」のOP、EDムービー制作など参加しました。ムービーのディレクションと絵コンテ、演出などを担当しました!" [I participated in the OP & ED production of the Nintendo Switch version of The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening, released today. I was in charge of the direction, storyboard and unit direction!] (Tweet) (in Japanese). Archived from the original on September 21, 2019. Retrieved September 21, 2019 – via Twitter.
  35. ^Katou, Oswald [@ozoztv] (September 20, 2019). "ゼルダの伝説夢をみる島発売おめでとうございます!OP、EDムービーの制作に参加しました。コンセプトアート、色彩設計、BG、他いろいろ。" [Congratulations on the release of Link’s Awakening! I participated in the production of the OP and ED movies. I did the concept art, color design and backgrounds, among other things.] (Tweet) (in Japanese). Archived from the original on September 21, 2019. Retrieved September 21, 2019 – via Twitter.
  36. ^Francis, Bryant (February 13, 2019). "Mario Maker 2 and a Link's Awakening remake drive today's Nintendo Direct". Gamasutra. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
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  44. ^Nintendo 2019, 28:57, "This might be the first Amiibo where Link looks exactly like he's taken out of the game; he looks just exactly like what he is in the game." harvnb error: no target: CITEREFNintendo2019 (help)
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External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Link%27s_Awakening_(2019_video_game)

You will also be interested:

Link's Awakening Items

This is a list of items found in Link's Awakening.

Equipment

Sword

LA Sword Art.png
Main article: Sword

Link will find his Sword on Toronbo Shores at the beginning of Link's Awakening. It is his primary weapon for the whole game and it should be equipped at all times, except when Link needs some other items out to get past an obstacle.

Koholint Sword

SeashellSword.png
Main article: Koholint Sword

This is the reward for finding 20 Secret Seashells. The L-2 Sword is stronger than the previous Sword, and it can also shoot beams when Link has full health. After obtaining it, the other six Secret Seashells Link never found will disappear. It is found in the Seashell Mansion south of Kanalet Castle.

Shield

LA Shield Art.png
Main article: Shield

The Shield is the first item Link will receive in Link's Awakening. Link gets it back from Tarin shortly after he wakes up in Marin and Tarin's House. This Shield can block projectiles, and that is pretty much it. A lot of players find themselves using it less and less as they progress through the game.

Mirror Shield

LA Mirror Shield Art.png
Main article: Mirror Shield

The Mirror Shield resides in Eagle's Tower, the seventh dungeon in Link's Awakening. It can reflect certain types of beams like fire that the old Shield could not reflect before. Although it is obtained as the dungeon item, it has little use in the battle with Evil Eagle. It blocks his feathers so Link won't fall off the tower as easily.

Bomb

LA Bomb Art.png
Main article: Bomb

Bombs are in almost every Zelda game, and Link's Awakening is no exception. They can destroy enemies, blow up weak walls, and more. They come in handy for many situations. The amount Link can hold can be upgraded to 60 Bombs if he goes down a hidden staircase near Martha's Bay where Mad Batter will give Link the upgrade as a "curse". Also, Bombs can be used with Arrows to make Bomb Arrows when the player puts Bombs on one button and Arrows on the other button. Then, by pressing both buttons at the same time, it will launch a Bomb Arrow.

Boomerang

LA Boomerang Art.png
Main article: Boomerang

Unlike other Zelda titles, the Boomerang is one of the strongest weapons in the whole game. It can destroy a lot of enemies in a single hit, as well as retrieve items off the ground such as Rupees. It can be found in a cave behind a bombable wall in Toronbo Shores. If Link has obtained the Magnifying Lens, Link will see a Goriya in the cave; Link should trade the item on the B Button (the Deluxe Shovel is recommended) to him in exchange for the Boomerang. The Boomerang can also defeat DethI, the final boss, in a single hit.

Bow

LA Bow Art.png
Main article: Bow

The Bow can be found in the Town Tool Shop found in Mabe Village mid-way through the game for a whopping 980 Rupees. Link can also steal it, but he will be referred to as THIEF by every character in the game thereafter, and returning to the shop will mean the shopkeeper kills him. The Bow can shoot Arrows to activate switches, defeat enemies, and more. Since it does all that, it is recommended Link gets it as early as he can.

Hookshot

LA Hookshot Art.png
Main article: Hookshot

The Hookshot can be found in the fifth dungeon of Link's Awakening, Catfish's Maw. It can propel Link towards certain materials, pull items towards him, defeat enemies, and much more. The Hookshot has appeared in most of the main canon games in the series. It stretches across most of the screen, making it a very useful item overall.

Magic Powder

LA Magic Powder Art.png
Main article: Magic Powder

The Magic Powder can be used for several things. It can light torches, help destroy enemies, and many other uses. It is obtained by finding the Sleepy Toadstool in the Mysterious Forest and giving it to Syrup the Witch. When Mad Batter gives Link the upgrade as a "curse", Link can hold up to 40 Magic Powder at once.

Magic Rod

MagicRodGuide.png
Main article: Magic Rod

Found in Turtle Rock, the Magic Rod, like the Hookshot, is one of the best weapons in the game. It shoots a blast of fire that is not only good at defeating enemies, but also at lighting torches. Like many items obtained in dungeons, the Magic Rod is used mainly for defeating the boss of Turtle Rock, Hot Head.

Ocarina

Ocarina LA.png
Main article: Ocarina

The Ocarina is found in the Dream Shrine in Mabe Village. Link can learn to play three songs on the Ocarina. The Ballad of the Wind Fish is one of the first songs Link learns in his adventure. When played on the Ocarina along with the Eight Instruments of the Sirens, the Wind Fish's Egg will open. Although not required, Link's next song he learns is the Manbo's Mambo that will warp Link to Manbo's Pond, near Crazy Tracy's Health Spa, and can be also used to warp Link to the beginning of a dungeon. The Frog's Song of Soul is the last song Link learns on the Ocarina which will revive the Flying Rooster.

Pegasus Boots

LA Pegasus Boots NPG.png
Main article: Pegasus Boots

The Pegasus Boots can be found in Key Cavern, the third dungeon in Link's Awakening. The pair of boots can be used with a couple of other items to make great effects. One of the many uses includes dashing them with the Sword which can be used to dash through certain type of rocks, or using the Roc's Feather with the boots for longer jumps.

Power Bracelet L-1

Power-Bracelet-Artwork-LA.png
Main article: Power Bracelet

Deep within Bottle Grotto, the second dungeon of the game, the Power Bracelet can be found. It can make Link lift up many different objects like rocks, pots, etc. This item is vital on defeating the boss of Bottle Grotto, the Genie. By using the Power Bracelet, Link can throw the Genie's bottle against the wall many times before it breaks.

Power Bracelet L-2

Power-Bracelet-L-2-Artwork-LA.png
Main article: Power Bracelet

An upgrade for the Power Bracelet, this Power Bracelet is obtained in the Face Shrine, the sixth dungeon in Link's Awakening. While being similar to the Power Bracelet found in Bottle Grotto, Link can now lift heavier objects. Like most items, it is needed to explore more of the Face Shrine due to the heavy elephant statues Link will find within it. Later, Link can use the upgraded Power Bracelet to lift an iron ball used in Eagle's Tower.

Roc's Feather

LA Roc's Feather Art.png
Main article: Roc's Feather

For the first time ever in a Zelda game, Link can now jump! The Roc's Feather can be found in Tail Cave. The use is simple. The player should equip it on either the A or B button and use it to jump. This feather comes in heavy use for the rest of the game, whether it is pits, hazardous surfaces, or just using it for fun.

Deluxe Shovel

Shovel.png
Main article: Shovel

A little through the game, the Deluxe Shovel can be bought in the Town Tool Shop for 200 Rupees. It can dig up things from the ground such as Hearts, Rupees, etc. Also, in some locations, it can dig up things like Secret Seashells and other items. When Link discovers the Goriya that wields the Boomerang, it is recommended that Link should trade this item to him for the Boomerang. Don't worry, as Link can always get it back if he will need it.

Inventory

Flippers

LA Flippers Art.png
Main article: Flippers

Found in Angler's Tunnel, the Flippers let Link swim in deep water. Press the A Button repeatedly to swim in the water. Press the B Button to dive down underwater to sometimes find items in certain places and underwater passages. These are automatic, meaning as soon as Link gets them, he will be able to swim in deep water automatically.

Golden Leaf

LA Golden Leaf Art.png
Main article: Golden Leaf

There are five Golden Leaves in Link's Awakening. Richard asks Link to go find his Golden Leaves he lost when he had to flee Kanalet Castle after his servants went mad. After Link retrieves all five Golden Leaves, he will give them to Richard in return for the Slime Key.

Piece of Heart

Piece of Heart - LA93 art.png
Main article: Piece of Heart

A total of twelve Pieces of Heart can be found in the game. For every four Link has obtained, he will gain another heart to his health. A total of three hearts will be added if he collects all twelve of them hidden throughout the island.

Secret Medicine

LA Secret Medicine Art.png
Main article: Secret Medicine

Link can buy the Secret Medicine from Crazy Tracy who lives near Manbo's Pond. She will sell some to Link for 27 Rupees. He can also find them in some treasure chests in the later dungeons. This medicine restores Link's life automatically after he dies. It is recommended Link saves the Secret Medicine for the later battles or the battle against The Shadow Nightmares.

Secret Seashell

LA Secret Seashell Art.png
Main article: Secret Seashell

There are 26 Secret Seashells total scattered across Koholint Island. When Link has found 20 of them, he should go to the Seashell Mansion located near Kanalet Castle. His reward will be the Koholint Sword, which is stronger and shoots beams out when Link has full health. Also, after Link finds 20 Secret Seashells and gets the Koholint Sword, the other six Link doesn't find will disappear.

Sleepy Toadstool

LA Sleepy Toadstool Art.png
Main article: Sleepy Toadstool

The Sleepy Toadstool is found deep within the Mysterious Forest. Once Link has found the Sleepy Toadstool, he should take it to Syrup the Witch and she'll make Magic Powder out of it.

Red Tunic

RedTunic.png
Main article: Red Tunic

The Red Tunic can be found at the end of the Color Dungeon. Link can choose between this tunic and the Blue Tunic. This tunic gives Link more attack power overall, practically making all enemies and some bosses health cut down by a half of what it was before. Once he has picked the Red Tunic, Link cannot go back and change his mind for the blue one.

Blue Tunic

BlueTunic.png
Main article: Blue Tunic

The Blue Tunic can be found at the end of the Color Dungeon. Link can choose between this one and the Red Tunic. This tunic gives Link more defense overall, practically doubling his health. Once Link has picked the Blue Tunic, he cannot go back and change his mind for the red one.

Eight Instruments of the Sirens

Full Moon Cello

Full Moon Cello.png
Main article: Eight Instruments of the Sirens#Full Moon Cello

Conch Horn

Conch Horn.png
Main article: Eight Instruments of the Sirens#Conch Horn

Sea Lily's Bell

Sea Lily's Bell.png
Main article: Eight Instruments of the Sirens#Sea Lily's Bell

Surf Harp

Surf Harp.png
Main article: Eight Instruments of the Sirens#Surf Harp

Wind Marimba

Wind Marimba.png
Main article: Eight Instruments of the Sirens#Wind Marimba

Coral Triangle

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Main article: Eight Instruments of the Sirens#Coral Triangle

Organ of Evening Calm

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Main article: Eight Instruments of the Sirens#Organ of Evening Calm

Thunder Drum

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Main article: Eight Instruments of the Sirens#Thunder Drum

Dungeon

Compass

Compass.png
Main article: Compass

Like most Zelda games, one Compass can be found in each dungeon. It lets Link see where all of the treasure chests are, as with the Nightmare's lair on the map when the game is paused. Also, it will make a beep tone-like sound whenever Link enters a room that has a Small Key or the Nightmare's Key.

Dungeon Map

LA Dungeon Map Art.png
Main article: Dungeon Map

The Dungeon Map's function is rather basic. It lets Link see all of the rooms and the shape of a dungeon on the pause menu. It doesn't do much else and is not required to beat a dungeon like the Compass.

Small Key

LA Small Key NPG.png
Main article: Small Key

Small Keys are only found in dungeons. They can be used once on one locked door, then they disappear. Also, the Compass will show Link if one is in a room with a beep-like tone if he has already obtained the Compass earlier. To see how many Link has, pause the game while in a dungeon and look on the right. Small Keys cannot be transferred between dungeons.

Nightmare Key

LA Nightmare Key NPG.png
Main article: Nightmare Key

The Nightmare's Key opens the door to the Nightmare's lair in each dungeon. It is always in a chest that is rather hard to reach. In every dungeon, Link will usually get this very late in the dungeon.

Stone Slab Fragment

Stoneslab.jpg
Main article: Stone Slab Fragment

There is one Stone Slab Fragment per dungeon, as well as a few Stone Slabs the fragment works with. Link can read the Stone Slab once he has obtained the fragment which gives him hints about various things in the dungeon he is in.

Stone Beak

Owl Stone Beak.png
Main article: Stone Beak

There is one Stone Beak per dungeon, as well as a few Owl Statues the beak works with. The Owl will talk to Link through these statues and gives him hints about various things in the dungeon he is in.

Heart Container

Heart Container - LA93 art.png
Main article: Heart Container

Like nearly every other Zelda title to date, Link can get a Heart Container after he defeats a boss encountered in a dungeon. Same goes for Link's Awakening; for all eight dungeon bosses, a Heart Container will come out of them after Link defeats them. It increases his life by one whole heart.

Keys

Tail Key

Tail-Key-Artwork.png
Main article: Tail Key

The first of the five keys, the Tail Key, is found within a treasure chest deep in the Mysterious Forest. It is needed to gain access to the first dungeon, known as Tail Cave.

Slime Key

Slime-Key-Artwork.png
Main article: Slime Key

The Slime Key is Link's reward from Richard for finding his Golden Leaves. After he lets Link gain access to Pothole Field behind his Villa, Link should dig in front of the Owl Statue for the key. This will gain him access to Key Cavern.

Angler Key

Angler Key Artwork.png
Main article: Angler Key

The Angler Key is found within Yarna Desert guarded by the desert dwelling creature, Desert Lanmola. Once acquired, Link should walk up to the lock in front of the waterfall on the foot of Tal Tal Heights. The waterfall will subside, revealing the entrance to Angler's Tunnel.

Face Key

Face-Key-Artwork.png
Main article: Face Key

Found in the Southern Face Shrine, the Face Key is what unlocks the Face Shrine. After Link has defeated the Armos Knight, Link is rewarded with the Face Key.

Bird Key

Bird-Key-Artwork.png
Main article: Bird Key

The Bird Key is last of the five keys Link will find in his adventure. It is found in a cave below the Hen House in Tal Tal Heights. It gains Link access to Eagle's Tower on the far northeastern side of Koholint Island.

Pick-Up

Guardian Acorn

LA Guardian Acorn Artwork.png
Main article: Guardian Acorn

Occasionally when Link defeats an enemy, a Guardian Acorn will come out of them. By picking it up, Link will have more defense for a time. It wears off when he gets hurt too many times. Different music will play when Link has it, and it stops playing when he loses it.

Piece of Power

LA Piece of Power Artwork.png
Main article: Piece of Power

Just like Guardian Acorns, Pieces of Power are also found sometimes after defeating an enemy. They will boost Link's attack and makes a little explosion on enemies that Link hits. Also, he runs a little faster when he is using one. As with Guardian Acorns, they also wear off whenever he gets hurt too much while using them.

Recovery Heart

Heart - LA93 art.png
Main article: Recovery Heart

Recovery Hearts, as explained in the name, restore Link's health. They can be found in bushes, inside enemies after defeating them, and much more. The Recovery Heart has been around since the The Legend of Zelda for the NES. To this day, Recovery Hearts still serve the same purpose.

Rupee

LA Rupee Art.png
Main article: Rupee

Rupees are basically the currency of Koholint Island. Blue Rupees can be found all over the place and it counts as one Rupee. Several chests in the game can hold as little as 20 Rupees, and as much as 200 Rupees. Rupees are vital for Link's quest so he can buy supplies and other items he may need.

Arrow

LA Arrow Artwork.png
Main article: Arrow

Arrows can be found all over the Overworld and in shops. They sometimes even come out of enemies after being defeated. If Link picks up an Arrow off the ground before he has the Bow, it will just give him one Rupee instead. An upgrade that will allow Link to hold up to 60 Arrows can be found down some stairs under a rock near Turtle Rock where Mad Batter will give Link the upgrade as a "curse". Arrows can also be used as a Bomb Arrow. The player can put the Bow & Arrow on one button and Bombs on the other. Then, by pressing both buttons at the same time, the Bow will launch a Bomb Arrow.

Trading Sequence

Yoshi Doll

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Main article: Yoshi Doll

Ribbon

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Main article: Ribbon

Dog Food

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Main article: Dog Food

Bananas

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Main article: Bananas

Stick

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Main article: Stick

Honeycomb

Link's Awakening - Honeycomb.png
Main article: Honeycomb

Pineapple

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Main article: Pineapple

Hibiscus

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Main article: Hibiscus

Letter

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Main article: Letter

Broom

Link's Awakening - Broom.png
Main article: Broom

Fishing Hook

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Main article: Fishing Hook

Mermaid's Necklace

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Main article: Mermaid's Necklace

Mermaid's Scale

MermaidScaleSprite.png
Main article: Mermaid's Scale

Magnifying Lens

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Main article: Magnifying Lens

The Magnifying Lens is the reward for finishing the Trading Sequence. It allows Link to see things and people that could not be seen before, including a Goriya who will offer the Boomerang. After obtaining the Scale from Martha, Link can go to the Mermaid Statue and it will move, revealing a staircase. Walking down this staircase will reveal the Magnifying Lens. On the way out, Link will be able to see the enemies that he couldn't see before.

Sours: https://www.zeldadungeon.net/wiki/Link%27s_Awakening_Items


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