Stevens ranger shotgun

Stevens ranger shotgun DEFAULT
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Helping a coffee buddy dispose of some estate guns. No Ithacas, Purdeys, etc but there is one double. Is this a Stevens 311 type make? or other?



It is very dirty but appears to have never to have apart or shot that much. 32 inch IM/F pit free barrels. It would make a good rainy day duck blind gun.

Last edited by Walter C. Snyder; 12/29/1303:32 PM.

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RANGER was a Sears, Roebuck & Co. "trade name."

That G.S. Lewis Patent No. 1,136,247, granted Apr. 20, 1915, action, which used coil-spring driven strikers rather than hammers which rotate about an axle, started out prior to WW-I as J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co.'s lower priced line the Riverside Arms Co. No. 315. J. Stevens Arms Co. continued to offer the Riverside No. 315 after the Great War.



After J. Stevens Arms Co. was acquired by Savage Arms Corp. they added a slightly nicer gun on the G.S. Lewis action the Stevens No. 330. From 1923 --



From 1928 --



By 1930 they gussied up the Stevens No. 330 a bit --



In 1929, J. Stevens Arms Co. changed the name of their lower priced line to Springfield Arms Co. For 1931, they introduced an even cheaper version called the Springfield No. 311 with a plain wood stock and forearm. By June 1932, J. Stevens Arms Co. introduced the option of a non-selective single trigger on these guns --



For 1936, J. Stevens Arms Co. began phasing in a new action with hammers that rotate about an axle, and the Stevens No. 330 was replaced by the No. 530 and the Springfield No. 315 was replaced by the No. 515. The No. 311 and numerous "trade brand" guns continued to be built on the Lewis action up to WW-II.

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If you have a close enough view you can spot the difference in the Lewis Action guns from the later swinging hammer guns at a glance.
Just look at the placement of the two cross pins in the rear of the frame. On the Lewis actions the rear (Sear) pin is higher than the front (hammer & cocking lever) pin, as on this Ranger. On the swinging hammer guns the rear pin is lower than the front one.
I learned this from Russ, had never noticed until he mentioned it.



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Researcher says "Ranger" was a Sears trade name. However, some of these neat little guns have the logo "Ward's Ranger" stamped on them, like my .410. CORRECTION, my .410 is a Model 50 Wards Hercules, not a Ranger.


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I believe that at different points in time the name Ranger was used by both of these Mail Order companies. I have a re-print edition of a 1927 Sears catalog & a ranger very similar to this one is listed in it. I cannot actually say it was made by Stevens, but certainly has that appearance in the illustration. I do not recall off hand if the illustration is good enough to make out the pin placement or not, but in 1927 from Researcher's data it would seem to have been the G S Lewis designed action.
At one point in time I had a 20 gauge based on this Lewis action named Central Arms & my Dad had a 16 gauge with swinging hammers named Eastern Arms. Any differences in the frame profiles were virtually unnoticeable except for the pin placements.



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some of these neat little guns have the logo "Ward's Ranger" stamped on them, like my .410.



Well, show us some pictures Murphy!! Inquiring minds want to know.

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I corrected my earlier post. My .410 is a Model 50 Ward's Hercules, not a Ranger. It's a sweet little gun with a factory Redhead pad. I'll count the pins and describe their location when I dig it out.



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STEVENS BROWNING RANGER 12GA PUMP SHOTGUN

View catalog

December 6, 2020

Sun City, AZ, US


Description: Browning Ranger 12Ga Pump Shotgun made by Stevens. This pump shotgun was invented by John Browning and licensed for production to Stevens Arms Company. It was sold under the Stevens label (and later by Savage) as the model 520. The Ranger brand was marketed by Sears & Roebuck. Caliber/ Gauge: 12 Gauge; Serial Number: U20769 Working Order: Firearm has not been tested; Background Check: Required; Keywords: Firearms, Guns; Ref: BD1207

  • Notes: FFL: All out-of-state purchasers of firearms post-1898 must be shipped to a licensed FFL dealer in your state. California does not allow the shipment of handguns or large-capacity magazines. Local bidders are required to fill out FFL paperwork and will be subject to a background check;
  • Dimensions: 30" Barrel
  • Artist Name: Browning
  • Condition: This shotgun is in good condition with signs of wear commensurate with age and use. Please see pictures for details.

Accepted Forms of Payment

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Shipping

LOCAL PICK UP - ARIZONA FIREARMS BUYERS
Arizona residents MUST pick-up in person at Bradford's Auction Gallery with a scheduled date of pick up. Details and information will be included on the winning bidders invoice. Any local Arizona Buyer of Post 1898 firearms MUST complete all necessary registration forms at Bradford's Auction Gallery. Local Buyers MUST have a Valid ARIZONA ID with Current Physical Address. If your Arizona ID does not reflect your current address you MUST provide us with a secondary form of ID that contains your correct address. Arizona Gun Dealers must have a signed copy of their Federal Firearms License in order to accept delivery of modern weapons. ANY DENIED BACKGROUND CHECK WILL RESULT IN A REFUND MINUS A 25% RESTOCKING FEE.

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Sours: https://www.bradfordsauction.com/auction-lot/stevens-browning-ranger-12ga-pump-shotgun_2C04099ABB
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Image of a Hunter Arms Ranger model posted with permission from GunsAmerica.com

Ranger was a trade name used on shotguns by Sears, Roebuck and Company of Chicago, IL. There are no viable references to positively date the introduction of the Ranger trade name by Sears. However, one reference states that the first Ranger gun was a variant of the Riverside (a J. Stevens Arms and Tool Company trade brand used on their economy line of products) Model 215 hammer shotgun.

The 1916 date is clouded, however, by the fact that J. Stevens Arm and Tool Company was purchased by New England Westinghouse Company (N.E.W.) in mid-1915 or mid-1916 (depending on which authority you wish to believe). At this time, all production of sporting firearms was immediately discontinued to allow N.E.W. to make Mosin-Nagant rifles for the Imperial Russian Government.

The next event in the Stevens saga is a 1919 newspaper reference stating that J. Stevens Arms Company (renamed by N.E.W. circa 1916) had resumed production of sporting firearms. In light of the above information, J. Stevens Arms Company could not have made Ranger brand shotguns in the 1916-1919 time frame.

Hunter Arms

The most viable reference I have found indicates that the first Ranger brand shotguns were made for Sears by Hunter Arms Company (makers of L. C. Smith shotguns). This Ranger version was a variant of the Hunter Arms Company Fulton Model box-lock gun made in the period 1916-1918. These shotguns were more expensive than the subsequent Stevens made Ranger models.

Retail value for a Ranger double barrel gun made by Hunter, in good or better condition, would range from $300 to $400 depending on gauge, mechanical and bore condition and remaining original wood and metal finish.

Stevens Riverside Model 215

The first Stevens made Ranger Model was the Ranger hammer double barrel, which is a variant of the Riverside Model 215 and could have been made for Sears in the period 1919-1929. This shotgun was constructed using features patent number 1,086,378 issued February 10, 1914 to G. S. Lewis and assigned to J. Stevens Arms and Tool Company that covered the use of coil spring driven hammers and pivoted triggers on hammer box-lock shotguns.

Ranger version of the Riverside Model 215. Image posted by Guest

Ranger version of the Riverside Model 215 images posted by rickyjoecollect

Stevens Riverside Model 315

The first Ranger hammerless double barrel gun made by J. Stevens Arms Company of Chicopee Falls, MA (a Savage Arms Corporation subsidiary after April 1, 1920) for Sears was a variant of the Riverside Model 315, possibly made as early as 1919. The Model 315 had a checkered, uncapped pistol grip stock and forearm made of standard walnut.

Ranger version of the Riverside Model 315. Image posted by BenWaofDayton

Stevens Model 330

The second Ranger double barrel made by Stevens was the Stevens Model 330 in 1922. This shotgun had a checkered select walnut capped pistol grip stock and forearm. Apart from this, it was otherwise very similar to the Riverside Model 315 variant.

Ranger version of the Stevens Model 330. Images posted by tybie3656

Springfield Model 315

The Riverside name was discontinued in 1929 and replaced by the Springfield name. The Ranger double guns made in the period 1929-1931 were variations of the Springfield Model 315, with no change from the Riverside Model 315 to the gun itself, except the block letters on the side of the frame.

ranger model 315.jpg

Ranger version of the Springfield Model 315 from the period 1929-1931. Image posted by OldRanger16

Springfield Model 311

Stevens reduced the quality of their economy line of products, including the Ranger double barrels, in 1931 by replacing the checkered walnut stocks and forearms with walnut finished, uncheckered hardwood stocks and forearms. These Rangers were variations of the new Springfield Model 311 and were made in the period 1931-1936.

ranger model 311.jpg

Rangner version of the Springfield Model 311 from the period 1931-1936. Image posted by Tony

The above Stevens/Riverside/Springfield brand hammerless shotguns were produced using the features of the G. S. Lewis patent number 1,136,247 issued April 20, 1915, which covered the use of coil spring driven strikers in hammerless double barrel guns rather than traditional revolving internal hammers. This design was the mainstay of double barrel guns for Stevens and trade brand models from 1919 to 1936.

Springfield Model 311 with a 5000 frame

Stevens replaced the G. S. Lewis patented action in 1936 with a heavier weight, malleable iron, No. 5000 frame, which was designed to accommodate rotating internal hammers, replacing the spring driven strikers of the Lewis action. This new frame was now used on the Springfield Model 311, as well as Stevens brand. Ranger double guns then became variations of this new internal hammer action built on the No. 5000 frame in the period 1936-1940.

Springfield Model 311 with a 5100 frame

In 1940, the lighter weight ductile iron No. 5100 frame replaced the No. 5000 frame in Stevens and Springfield brand guns. This new internal hammer action became the basis for all trade brand guns, including Ranger, in the period 1940-1947.

Retail value for a Ranger double barrel gun made by Stevens in the period 1916-1947 in good or better condition would range from $150 to $300+ depending on gauge, mechanical and bore condition and remaining original wood and metal finish.

Ranger version of the Springfield Model 311 with 5100 frame. Image posted by pmetheney

Ranger Over and Under

The final Ranger model was a departure from the Stevens and Hunter Arms versions. This was the Ranger Over and Under double barrel gun, which was a variation of the Marlin Firearms Company of New Haven, CT Model 90 made for Sears in the period 1941-1947.

Retail value for a Ranger Over and Under gun made by Marlin in good or better condition would range from $275 to $400 depending on gauge, mechanical and bore condition and remaining original wood and metal finish.

Ranger over/under version of the Marln Model 90. Images posted by Jack Rysewyk

The Ranger trade name era ended in 1946 when Sears adopted the J. C. Higgins brand. There was actually a person named John Higgins who started working Sears Roebuck and Company and rose to become Vice President until his retirement in 1930. Higgins had no middle name, however, so Sears added the “C” middle initial to make the name more presentable to their customers.

Two Old Dogs is a meister administrator and an all time top contributor at Gun Values Board.

Sours: https://www.gunvaluesboard.com/sears-roebuck-and-company-ranger-brand-double-barrel-shotguns-2762.html
1915 Ranger Shotgun (Serial from around 1920)

The Origins

The Stevens 520 began life in 1903 as a submitted patent by one John Moses Browning, which detailed a new shotgun with an internal hammer, locking-breech block, and a take-down design. The patent caught the interest of the J. Stevens Arms and Tool Company, as they knew slide-actuated repeating shotguns were becoming hot stuff at the dawn of the 20th century. However, they lacked such a model of their own to round out the product mix.

From the gun’s inception, Stevens offered the 520 with two standard, full-choked barrel lengths: 28″ and 30″. Guns were produced with Stevens rollmarks prior to 1929. After this point the design continued on in the form of various “department store” re-brands, which by some estimates are more plentiful than the Stevens-marked shotguns. Such examples of these 520s include the Ranger Model 30 for Sears, the Western Field Model 30 for Montgomery Ward, the Riverside Arms Model 520 and the J.C. Higgins “102.25.” Truly — a rose by any other name!

Two things conspired against the 520, nearly bringing it to death’s doorstep in the 1930s. The first was the introduction of the Model 620 in 1927. Savage (which had become Stevens’ parent company) was keenly aware the 520 was pug-ugly so the company rolled out the Stevens Model 620. Identical to the 520 internally, it differed only by virtue of a more “modern,” rounded profile to the receiver. The second existential threat to the 520 was the Great Depression, which poured cold water on firearms sales across the board.

Given a weak economy and a more-popular sister product cannibalizing demand, Savage began to warehouse 520s in the 1930s. However, the design was given a new lease on life at the dawn of World War II because the U.S. government needed combat firearms in a hurry, and bought up every repeating shotgun in Savage’s warehouse regardless of configuration.

Production of a handier “riot” version with a 20″ cylinder-bored barrel (the 520-30) ramped up quickly for wartime. Many of these military 520-30s were further modified into “trench gun” configurations consisting of a bayonet lug and heat shield. About 35,000 of the Stevens 520s and 620s saw action — a figure exceeding the number of M1941 Johnson rifles used in combat!

Sours: https://gunsmagazine.com/guns/shotguns/stevens-520/

Shotgun stevens ranger

Stevens Model 520/620

Shotgun

Stevens Model 520/620
Stevens 520 1935-37.JPG

Stevens Model 520

TypeShotgun
Place of originUnited States
Used byUS Military (M520-30, M620)
WarsWorld War II, Korean War, Vietnam War
DesignerJohn Browning
ManufacturerJ. Stevens Arms & Tool Co (1909-1916), J. Stevens Arms Co/Savage Arms Co (1916-1955)
ProducedModel 520 (1909-1939), Model 620 (1927-1939), Model 520A (1940-1947), Model 620A (1940-1955)
No. built191,000+
VariantsModels 522, 525, 530, 535, 621 Ranger 30, 31, 102.25 JC Higgins 102.25 Western Field 30, 35, 60

The Stevens Model 520 was a pump-actionshotgun developed by John Browning and originally manufactured by the J Stevens Arms & Tool Company between 1909 and 1916.[1] Stevens was sold to New England Westinghouse on 28 May 1915 and production of civilian firearms was greatly reduced.[1] The company was renamed the "J Stevens Arms Company" on 1 July 1916 and New England Westinghouse used their manufacturing facility in Chicopee Falls, MA to produce Mosin-Nagant rifles under contract for the Russian Czar during World War I.[2] After the war, Stevens was sold to Savage Arms on 1 April 1920 and full production of civilian firearms resumed.[3] Under Savage ownership, Model 520 production continued until 1939[1] when it was replaced by the Model 520A which ended production in 1948.[4] Stevens also further modified the design when they introduced the streamlined Model 620 in 1927.[5] The Model 620 was internally similar to the Model 520 and was produced until 1939[6] when it was replaced by the Model 620A which ended production in 1955.[7] This shotgun is a hammerless, pump action, take-down design with a tubular magazine which holds 5 shells. All models can also be slam fired: the shotgun has no trigger disconnector and shells can be fired one after the other simply by working the slide if the trigger is held down.

Background[edit]

John Browning filed a patent for a “hammerless” shotgun with a unique take-down barrel and locking breech block on 10 Jul 1903, it was approved on 7 Feb 1905 and along with a separate 27 Aug 1907 patent, that applied to the connection between the slide arm and the fore-end, became what would be the Stevens

Browning Patent: 7 Feb 1905 Take-Down Feature (M520-30)

Model 520. Browning eventually sold this design to the J Stevens Arms & Tool Company in Chicopee Falls MA.

Model 520[edit]

Stevens Model 520 (1909-1913)
Public Domain
Stevens Catalog No. 53 (1911)

The first Stevens 520 appeared in Stevens' 1909 Catalog No. 52 and was also offered for sale in the fall 1909 Sears & Roebuck catalog.[4][8] It is easily recognizable by its "humpback" double receiver. It has a round slide release knob on the left side of the receiver, a visible breach locking bolt on the top of the receiver, and base models have a rounded pistol grip on the buttstock. The foregrip is ringed and uniform in size. The trigger housing is retained with three screws and the safety is a lever located inside the trigger guard in front of the trigger. The cartridge stop is a rocker design with a set screw on the front right side of the receiver. There were other models including a Model 522 trap gun and the 525, 530, and 535 with increasing levels of engraving and stock quality (some straight grip) and foregrips.[9] Internally there is an inertial slide release block that is affixed to the inside of the receiver. This inertial release uses the recoil of a discharged round to unlock the breech. The action was designed to only unlock after firing or with the use of the slide release and not by dry firing like many modern shotguns. All model 520s were only offered in 12 gauge until 1928.[10]

Stevens Model 520 (1920-1924)

Around 1918, Stevens provided a 520 trench gun prototype to the US military for service in World War I. Supposedly, several examples were made but no known examples survive. It had a unique two piece heat shield-bayonet lug.[11]

When Savage Arms purchased Stevens in 1920,[3] the Model 520 was updated, incorporating several design changes that were emerging prior to 1916. These include a relocated slide release button, moved from the left side of the receiver to the left side of the trigger plate, and a redesigned inertial slide release, incorporated into the design of the trigger plate.

Stevens Model 520 (1926-1927)

In 1925, the Model 520 first appeared as a store-branded gun when it is sold as the Ranger Repeater Model 30 by Sears[12] and the Western Field Model 30 by Montgomery Wards. Around this time the inertial slide release blocks were removed and replaced with a spring that provided forward pressure on the slide release. Guns made after this time can be unlocked after a dry fire with forwarding pressure on the slide.

In 1928, the first sub-gauge Model 520 was introduced when a 16 gauge option was offered.[13] It was followed in 1930 by a 20 gauge Model 520.[14]

Stevens Model 520 (1938-1939)

The Model 520 last appeared in a Stevens sales publication in 1928 and 1929 (Catalog #57)[5] but remained in full production until 1939.[15] During this time it was sold as a store branded gun and under Stevens' budget line Riverside Arms. The shotgun went through several design changes during this period. Most notably was a redesign of the cartridge stop in 1933 and the relocation of the safety, from inside the trigger guard to behind the trigger in 1937.

Model 520 production ended in 1939 and it was replaced by the improved Model 520A in 1940.[16]

Model 520A[edit]

Stevens Model 520A (1940-1941)

The redesigned Model 520A was closely related to the Model 520, utilizing the same takedown action and locking breech block. The receiver lost the distinctive double hump and had a flat top and squared-off back end. The safety was moved to the receiver tang and the trigger housing was redesigned to use a coil mainspring instead of a flat bar mainspring. The 520A continued to be sold as a store-branded gun and under Stevens' budget line Riverside Arms (stamped Model 520). The 520A was never shown in a Stevens sales publication, it only appeared in Sears & Roebuck and Montgomery Wards catalogs and in Stevens component parts catalogs (the only source where it was identified as a 520A).[17]

Stevens halted civilian production in 1942 to make weapons for use by the US military during World War II (see Model 520-30 below). Civilian Model 520A production resumed after World War II, again as store-branded guns, and continued until 1948.[18]

Model 620[edit]

Stevens Model 620 (1938-39) 20Ga

The Model 620 was introduced in 1927 and is a streamlined version of the original 520. The safety was initially located inside the trigger housing just like the Model 520 but by 1929 it had been changed to a cross-bolt located behind the trigger. The stock was attached by a bolt connecting the receiver and trigger tangs through the grip of the stock. Initially, the 620 was only offered in 12 gauge but a 16 gauge followed in 1928 and a 20 gauge was introduced in 1930.

Model 620A[edit]

The Model 620A began production in 1940. The main difference between the 620 and the 620A was how the stock attaches. The 620A used a long draw bolt through the end of the stock and did away with the receiver and trigger plate tangs used on the 620. Without the trigger tang, a flat mainspring had no place to attach and the 620A had a shortened trigger housing using a coil mainspring. Civilian production of the Model 620A halted during World War II but continued afterward until 1955.

Model 520-30 and 620A (US military)[edit]

Stevens World War II riot gun markings (M620A)
Stevens World War II trench gun markings (M520-30)

During World War II, Stevens began producing both the Model 520A (renamed the Model 520-30) and the Model 620A (labeled as the Model 620) as trench guns, riot guns, and long-barreled training guns for the US military. Trench guns were produced with 20-inch barrels (cylinder bore) and had heat shields with unique pinkish anodized bayonet lugs attached to the front (late war examples had a small "S" stamped on the left side).

The receivers of both models were stamped on the left side (from front to back) with a small "P" and ordnance bomb, "Model 520-30" or "Model 620", and a small "U.S." over the trigger. Model 520-30 trench gun barrels are marked "Proof Tested--12 Gauge --2 3/4 Inch Chamber--" on the left side and have another small "P" and ordnance bomb and the "J Stevens Arms Company" address on the right side of the barrel. This was done so that all the markings could be read with the heat shield installed. Some Model 620 trench gun barrels were marked in the same manner as the Model 520-30 trench guns and some had all the barrel markings on the left side. Trench guns were also fitted with a sling swivel in the stock. Riot guns also had 20-inch barrels (cylinder bore) and had all the same martial markings, except that all the barrel markings were on the left side. The long-barreled training guns were marked in the same manner as riot guns and were mainly used for aerial gunnery training. Total wartime production of all Model 520-30 shotguns was 33,306 and all Model 620 shotguns were 12,174.[19]

After the war, the US military standardized both the Model 520-30 and the Model 620 and kept them in the inventory. They were used in the Korean War and as late as the Vietnam War.[20]

Stevens World War II M520-30 trench gun with M1917 bayonet

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcVorisek, Joseph (1992). A Short Illustrated History of the J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company. Cornell Publications. pp. 3–7, 67, 90–91.
  2. ^Lapin, Terence. "The American Mosin Nagants". Mosin-Nagant.net. Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  3. ^ abVorisek, Joseph (1994). A Short Illustrated History of the Savage Arms Company 1895 to 1945. Cornell Publications. p. 4.
  4. ^ abSears & Roebuck Catalog. Sears & Roebuck. 1909–1947. pp. Multiple pages spanning 38 years and 76 editions (Spring/Fall).
  5. ^ abStevens No. 57. J. Stevens Arms Company. 1928. p. 29.
  6. ^Stevens Rifles and Shotguns. J. Stevens Arms Company. 1940. p. 7.
  7. ^Savage, Stevens and Fox, Shotguns and Rifles. Savage Arms Corporation. 1955. p. 11.
  8. ^Stevens Firearms General Catalog and Component Parts #52 (Revised). J Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 1909. pp. 91–98.
  9. ^Stevens Firearms General Catalog No. 53. J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company. 1911. pp. 4–8.
  10. ^Stevens Catalogs 1909-1930. J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company/J. Stevens Arms Company. 1909–1930. pp. Multiple.
  11. ^Canfield, Bruce (2007). Complete Guide to US Military Combat Shotguns. Mowbray Publishers Inc. pp. 47–48. ISBN .
  12. ^Sears & Roebuck Fall Catalog 1925. Sears & Roebuck. p. 956.
  13. ^Sears & Roebuck Catalog Fall 1928. Sears & Roebuck. 1928. p. 587.
  14. ^Sears & Roebuck Catalog Fall 1930. Sears & Roebuck. 1930. p. 571.
  15. ^Sears & Roebuck Catalog Fall 1939. Sears & Roebuck. 1939. p. 950.
  16. ^Sears & Roebuck Catalog Fall 1940. Sears & Roebuck. 1940. p. 1064.
  17. ^Component Parts List for Savage, Stevens, Fox Shotguns and Rifles 1951-52. Savage Arms Corporation. 1951. p. 37.
  18. ^Sears & Roebuck Catalog Fall 1947. Sears & Roebuck. 1947. p. 584.
  19. ^Canfield, Bruce (2007). Complete Guide to US Military Combat Shotguns. Mowbray Publishers Inc. pp. 94–95, 117, 134–139. ISBN .
  20. ^Complete Guide to US Military Combat Shotguns. p. 163.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevens_Model_520/620
Weirdest Action Ever - Stevens Ranger 101.16 \

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